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Dry Eyes: The Unexpected Symptom of Menopause

Menopause marks a significant transition in a woman’s life, bringing a mix of challenges and transformations. As conversations about its impact on the body become more open and widespread, understanding this phase becomes increasingly crucial. 

 

The unexpected symptom of menopause

 

When thinking of the symptoms associated with menopause, we gravitate towards some of the more commonly known symptoms, such as hot flushes and changes in mood.[1] 

 

Having dry eyes often can be a sign that you are suffering with Dry Eye Syndrome, which can be a symptom of menopause.[2]

 

What is Dry Eye Syndrome?

 

Dry Eye Syndrome, also referred to as Dry Eye Disease, is a common condition that affects one in four people in the UK.[3]

 

When your tears fail to provide sufficient lubrication for your eyes, you might experience inflammation accompanied by various symptoms. These can include: 

 

  • Redness 
  • Itchy eyes 
  • Sensitivity to light 
  • A burning sensation 
  • In some cases, fatigue 

 

Symptoms are wide-ranging, so if you’re experiencing discomfort and irritation in your eyes, it may be Dry Eye Syndrome.[4] Find out more symptoms here. 

 

Why are dry eyes a symptom of menopause?

 

As menopause progresses, the levels of androgen hormones decrease, impacting the meibomian and lacrimal glands in the eyelids. The meibomian glands are responsible for producing the essential oils in tears. Consequently, a reduction in these oils leads to faster tear evaporation, resulting in drier eyes. 

 

Are dry eyes a common symptom of menopause?

 

You might feel alone with your Dry Eye symptoms, but it’s more common than you think for women to experience dry eyes during menopause. In fact, about 61% of perimenopausal and menopausal women are affected by Dry Eye Syndrome.[2]

 

While menopausal experiences differ greatly among individuals, and can be influenced by age, it’s important to recognise that your symptoms may not mirror those of your friends.[2]  

 

What other things can make Dry Eye worse?

 

Dry Eye Syndrome is a multifaceted condition with a variety of underlying causes, each contributing to its diverse symptoms. 

 

Several factors can trigger flare-ups, intensifying the discomfort of Dry Eye. Understanding these factors can help manage and potentially alleviate the symptoms. Here are some key elements that can worsen Dry Eye Syndrome: 

 

Smoke

Exposure to smoke can worsen your Dry Eye symptoms, causing increased burning, stinging, and scratchiness. To mitigate these issues, try to avoid cigarette smoke and fires. 

 

Going outside without your sunglasses

Unfortunately, this can also exacerbate Dry Eye symptoms. Your eyes need protection not only from the sun but also from the wind. 

 

We’re all guilty of choosing sunglasses based on their appearance but opt for ones that are also practical – that fit your face well and have side frames for extra protection. 

 

Looking at screens for too long

In today’s digital age, we spend a significant amount of time focused  on screens. Unfortunately, excessive screen time can worsen Dry Eye symptoms. Ensure you are taking regular breaks from your screens throughout the day 

 

Not blinking enough

It may sound silly, but make a conscious effort to blink more frequently, especially when you’re in front of a screen, reading, driving, or watching TV. When we’re deeply focused, our blink rate tends to decrease. 

 

Blinking is beneficial for your eyes as it helps spread your tears evenly across the surface, keeping them well-lubricated. 

 

Eating poorly

We all love a bit of chocolate and a packet of crisps, but it’s essential to maintain a balanced and nutritious diet for the sake of your eye health. 

 

In addition to enjoying your favourite snacks in moderation, ensure your diet includes a variety of nutrient-rich foods that support overall well-being, including the health of your eyes. 

 

Find out which vitamins are best for helping ease Dry Eye Syndrome symptoms here.[5]

 

 

Managing Dry Eye symptoms during menopause

 

Prioritising the health of your eyes becomes even more crucial when navigating conditions like Dry Eye, particularly during menopause. 

 

Making lifestyle changes can help manage your Dry Eye symptoms during menopause. 

 

As mentioned above, decreasing screen time and eating a nutritious diet are two lifestyle changes that can help with Dry Eye symptoms, some others could be: 

 

Use a humidifier

Enhancing the moisture levels in your home and workspace can provide considerable relief from Dry Eye discomfort. 

 

Avoiding contact lenses

Regularly wearing contact lenses can make dry eyes worse. Seek guidance from a healthcare professional to explore switching to glasses or specialised contact lenses tailored for dry eyes.[6]

 

Keep well hydrated

Drinking plenty of water not only keeps you feeling good but also helps to keep your eyes lubricated and moist. So, don’t forget to sip on that H2O throughout the day to keep your peepers happy and healthy![7]

 

Follow a three-step treatment plan

Following a three-step treatment plan is a great way to effectively manage your Dry Eye. 

 

Step 1: To kickstart relief, start by using a heated compress, such as MeiboPatch® to unblock your meibomian glands and ease eye discomfort. Ensure to lay this over your upper face so that it covers the bridge of your nose, upper and lower eyelids.[8]

 

Step 2: Clear away the melted oil obstructing your glands and any accumulated debris with a cleanser such as Naviblef®, specially designed to reduce discomfort. 

 

Step 3: Use an effective lubricant, such as eye drops or gels from our VISUfarma range. There you’ll find a product that will help ease your symptoms, depending on your condition.[9]

 

Looking for more information on Dry Eye and menopause?

 

To dive deeper into Dry Eye and menopause, check out our other insightful blogs on the topic. If you have any questions or need assistance, don’t hesitate to reach out to us. We’re here to support you on your journey to eye health and wellness. 

 

 

References

  1. NHS Inform, ‘Signs and Symptoms of Menopause’, 14/03/2023, Last Accessed June 2024
  2. Dry Eye Care Net, ‘What’s the Link Between Dry Eye and Menopause?’, 08/04/2021, Last Accessed June 2024
  3. Association of Optometrists, ‘Dry Eye Syndrome’, Last Accessed June 2024
  4. Dry Eye and Me, ‘Dry Eye Symptoms’, Last Accessed June 2024
  5. WebMD, ‘Are You Making Your Dry Eyes Worse?’, 03/12/2012, Last Accessed June 2024
  6. Healthline, ‘What’s the Link Between Dry Eye and Menopause’, 04/04/2024, Last Accessed June 2024
  7. Evergreen Eye Centre, ‘Can Hydration make a Difference if you Have Dry Eyes?’
  8. VISUfarma, Meibopatch®, Last Accessed June 2024
  9. VISUfarma, Naviblef®, Last Accessed June 2024
Back to news

Dry Eye and Menopause Demystified 

Menopause marks a significant transition in a woman’s life, bringing a mix of challenges and transformations. As conversations about its impact on the body become more open and widespread, understanding this phase becomes increasingly crucial. 

 

The unexpected symptom of menopause

 

When thinking of the symptoms associated with menopause, we gravitate towards some of the more commonly known symptoms, such as hot flushes and changes in mood.[1] 

 

Having dry eyes often can be a sign that you are suffering with Dry Eye Syndrome, which can be a symptom of menopause.[2]

 

What is Dry Eye Syndrome?

 

Dry Eye Syndrome, also referred to as Dry Eye Disease, is a common condition that affects one in four people in the UK.[3]

 

When your tears fail to provide sufficient lubrication for your eyes, you might experience inflammation accompanied by various symptoms. These can include: 

 

  • Redness 
  • Itchy eyes 
  • Sensitivity to light 
  • A burning sensation 
  • In some cases, fatigue 

 

Symptoms are wide-ranging, so if you’re experiencing discomfort and irritation in your eyes, it may be Dry Eye Syndrome.[4] Find out more symptoms here. 

 

Why are dry eyes a symptom of menopause?

 

As menopause progresses, the levels of androgen hormones decrease, impacting the meibomian and lacrimal glands in the eyelids. The meibomian glands are responsible for producing the essential oils in tears. Consequently, a reduction in these oils leads to faster tear evaporation, resulting in drier eyes. 

 

Are dry eyes a common symptom of menopause?

 

You might feel alone with your Dry Eye symptoms, but it’s more common than you think for women to experience dry eyes during menopause. In fact, about 61% of perimenopausal and menopausal women are affected by Dry Eye Syndrome.[2]

 

While menopausal experiences differ greatly among individuals, and can be influenced by age, it’s important to recognise that your symptoms may not mirror those of your friends.[2]  

 

What other things can make Dry Eye worse?

 

Dry Eye Syndrome is a multifaceted condition with a variety of underlying causes, each contributing to its diverse symptoms. 

 

Several factors can trigger flare-ups, intensifying the discomfort of Dry Eye. Understanding these factors can help manage and potentially alleviate the symptoms. Here are some key elements that can worsen Dry Eye Syndrome: 

 

Smoke

Exposure to smoke can worsen your Dry Eye symptoms, causing increased burning, stinging, and scratchiness. To mitigate these issues, try to avoid cigarette smoke and fires. 

 

Going outside without your sunglasses

Unfortunately, this can also exacerbate Dry Eye symptoms. Your eyes need protection not only from the sun but also from the wind. 

 

We’re all guilty of choosing sunglasses based on their appearance but opt for ones that are also practical – that fit your face well and have side frames for extra protection. 

 

Looking at screens for too long

In today’s digital age, we spend a significant amount of time focused  on screens. Unfortunately, excessive screen time can worsen Dry Eye symptoms. Ensure you are taking regular breaks from your screens throughout the day 

 

Not blinking enough

It may sound silly, but make a conscious effort to blink more frequently, especially when you’re in front of a screen, reading, driving, or watching TV. When we’re deeply focused, our blink rate tends to decrease. 

 

Blinking is beneficial for your eyes as it helps spread your tears evenly across the surface, keeping them well-lubricated. 

 

Eating poorly

We all love a bit of chocolate and a packet of crisps, but it’s essential to maintain a balanced and nutritious diet for the sake of your eye health. 

 

In addition to enjoying your favourite snacks in moderation, ensure your diet includes a variety of nutrient-rich foods that support overall well-being, including the health of your eyes. 

 

Find out which vitamins are best for helping ease Dry Eye Syndrome symptoms here.[5]

 

 

Managing Dry Eye symptoms during menopause

 

Prioritising the health of your eyes becomes even more crucial when navigating conditions like Dry Eye, particularly during menopause. 

 

Making lifestyle changes can help manage your Dry Eye symptoms during menopause. 

 

As mentioned above, decreasing screen time and eating a nutritious diet are two lifestyle changes that can help with Dry Eye symptoms, some others could be: 

 

Use a humidifier

Enhancing the moisture levels in your home and workspace can provide considerable relief from Dry Eye discomfort. 

 

Avoiding contact lenses

Regularly wearing contact lenses can make dry eyes worse. Seek guidance from a healthcare professional to explore switching to glasses or specialised contact lenses tailored for dry eyes.[6]

 

Keep well hydrated

Drinking plenty of water not only keeps you feeling good but also helps to keep your eyes lubricated and moist. So, don’t forget to sip on that H2O throughout the day to keep your peepers happy and healthy![7]

 

Follow a three-step treatment plan

Following a three-step treatment plan is a great way to effectively manage your Dry Eye. 

 

Step 1: To kickstart relief, start by using a heated compress, such as MeiboPatch® to unblock your meibomian glands and ease eye discomfort. Ensure to lay this over your upper face so that it covers the bridge of your nose, upper and lower eyelids.[8]

 

Step 2: Clear away the melted oil obstructing your glands and any accumulated debris with a cleanser such as Naviblef®, specially designed to reduce discomfort. 

 

Step 3: Use an effective lubricant, such as eye drops or gels from our VISUfarma range. There you’ll find a product that will help ease your symptoms, depending on your condition.[9]

 

Looking for more information on Dry Eye and menopause?

 

To dive deeper into Dry Eye and menopause, check out our other insightful blogs on the topic. If you have any questions or need assistance, don’t hesitate to reach out to us. We’re here to support you on your journey to eye health and wellness. 

 

 

References

  1. NHS Inform, ‘Signs and Symptoms of Menopause’, 14/03/2023, Last Accessed June 2024
  2. Dry Eye Care Net, ‘What’s the Link Between Dry Eye and Menopause?’, 08/04/2021, Last Accessed June 2024
  3. Association of Optometrists, ‘Dry Eye Syndrome’, Last Accessed June 2024
  4. Dry Eye and Me, ‘Dry Eye Symptoms’, Last Accessed June 2024
  5. WebMD, ‘Are You Making Your Dry Eyes Worse?’, 03/12/2012, Last Accessed June 2024
  6. Healthline, ‘What’s the Link Between Dry Eye and Menopause’, 04/04/2024, Last Accessed June 2024
  7. Evergreen Eye Centre, ‘Can Hydration make a Difference if you Have Dry Eyes?’
  8. VISUfarma, Meibopatch®, Last Accessed June 2024
  9. VISUfarma, Naviblef®, Last Accessed June 2024
Back to news

Dealing with Dry Eye and Menopause in the Office

Menopause marks a significant transition in a woman’s life, bringing a mix of challenges and transformations. As conversations about its impact on the body become more open and widespread, understanding this phase becomes increasingly crucial. 

 

The unexpected symptom of menopause

 

When thinking of the symptoms associated with menopause, we gravitate towards some of the more commonly known symptoms, such as hot flushes and changes in mood.[1] 

 

Having dry eyes often can be a sign that you are suffering with Dry Eye Syndrome, which can be a symptom of menopause.[2]

 

What is Dry Eye Syndrome?

 

Dry Eye Syndrome, also referred to as Dry Eye Disease, is a common condition that affects one in four people in the UK.[3]

 

When your tears fail to provide sufficient lubrication for your eyes, you might experience inflammation accompanied by various symptoms. These can include: 

 

  • Redness 
  • Itchy eyes 
  • Sensitivity to light 
  • A burning sensation 
  • In some cases, fatigue 

 

Symptoms are wide-ranging, so if you’re experiencing discomfort and irritation in your eyes, it may be Dry Eye Syndrome.[4] Find out more symptoms here. 

 

Why are dry eyes a symptom of menopause?

 

As menopause progresses, the levels of androgen hormones decrease, impacting the meibomian and lacrimal glands in the eyelids. The meibomian glands are responsible for producing the essential oils in tears. Consequently, a reduction in these oils leads to faster tear evaporation, resulting in drier eyes. 

 

Are dry eyes a common symptom of menopause?

 

You might feel alone with your Dry Eye symptoms, but it’s more common than you think for women to experience dry eyes during menopause. In fact, about 61% of perimenopausal and menopausal women are affected by Dry Eye Syndrome.[2]

 

While menopausal experiences differ greatly among individuals, and can be influenced by age, it’s important to recognise that your symptoms may not mirror those of your friends.[2]  

 

What other things can make Dry Eye worse?

 

Dry Eye Syndrome is a multifaceted condition with a variety of underlying causes, each contributing to its diverse symptoms. 

 

Several factors can trigger flare-ups, intensifying the discomfort of Dry Eye. Understanding these factors can help manage and potentially alleviate the symptoms. Here are some key elements that can worsen Dry Eye Syndrome: 

 

Smoke

Exposure to smoke can worsen your Dry Eye symptoms, causing increased burning, stinging, and scratchiness. To mitigate these issues, try to avoid cigarette smoke and fires. 

 

Going outside without your sunglasses

Unfortunately, this can also exacerbate Dry Eye symptoms. Your eyes need protection not only from the sun but also from the wind. 

 

We’re all guilty of choosing sunglasses based on their appearance but opt for ones that are also practical – that fit your face well and have side frames for extra protection. 

 

Looking at screens for too long

In today’s digital age, we spend a significant amount of time focused  on screens. Unfortunately, excessive screen time can worsen Dry Eye symptoms. Ensure you are taking regular breaks from your screens throughout the day 

 

Not blinking enough

It may sound silly, but make a conscious effort to blink more frequently, especially when you’re in front of a screen, reading, driving, or watching TV. When we’re deeply focused, our blink rate tends to decrease. 

 

Blinking is beneficial for your eyes as it helps spread your tears evenly across the surface, keeping them well-lubricated. 

 

Eating poorly

We all love a bit of chocolate and a packet of crisps, but it’s essential to maintain a balanced and nutritious diet for the sake of your eye health. 

 

In addition to enjoying your favourite snacks in moderation, ensure your diet includes a variety of nutrient-rich foods that support overall well-being, including the health of your eyes. 

 

Find out which vitamins are best for helping ease Dry Eye Syndrome symptoms here.[5]

 

 

Managing Dry Eye symptoms during menopause

 

Prioritising the health of your eyes becomes even more crucial when navigating conditions like Dry Eye, particularly during menopause. 

 

Making lifestyle changes can help manage your Dry Eye symptoms during menopause. 

 

As mentioned above, decreasing screen time and eating a nutritious diet are two lifestyle changes that can help with Dry Eye symptoms, some others could be: 

 

Use a humidifier

Enhancing the moisture levels in your home and workspace can provide considerable relief from Dry Eye discomfort. 

 

Avoiding contact lenses

Regularly wearing contact lenses can make dry eyes worse. Seek guidance from a healthcare professional to explore switching to glasses or specialised contact lenses tailored for dry eyes.[6]

 

Keep well hydrated

Drinking plenty of water not only keeps you feeling good but also helps to keep your eyes lubricated and moist. So, don’t forget to sip on that H2O throughout the day to keep your peepers happy and healthy![7]

 

Follow a three-step treatment plan

Following a three-step treatment plan is a great way to effectively manage your Dry Eye. 

 

Step 1: To kickstart relief, start by using a heated compress, such as MeiboPatch® to unblock your meibomian glands and ease eye discomfort. Ensure to lay this over your upper face so that it covers the bridge of your nose, upper and lower eyelids.[8]

 

Step 2: Clear away the melted oil obstructing your glands and any accumulated debris with a cleanser such as Naviblef®, specially designed to reduce discomfort. 

 

Step 3: Use an effective lubricant, such as eye drops or gels from our VISUfarma range. There you’ll find a product that will help ease your symptoms, depending on your condition.[9]

 

Looking for more information on Dry Eye and menopause?

 

To dive deeper into Dry Eye and menopause, check out our other insightful blogs on the topic. If you have any questions or need assistance, don’t hesitate to reach out to us. We’re here to support you on your journey to eye health and wellness. 

 

 

References

  1. NHS Inform, ‘Signs and Symptoms of Menopause’, 14/03/2023, Last Accessed June 2024
  2. Dry Eye Care Net, ‘What’s the Link Between Dry Eye and Menopause?’, 08/04/2021, Last Accessed June 2024
  3. Association of Optometrists, ‘Dry Eye Syndrome’, Last Accessed June 2024
  4. Dry Eye and Me, ‘Dry Eye Symptoms’, Last Accessed June 2024
  5. WebMD, ‘Are You Making Your Dry Eyes Worse?’, 03/12/2012, Last Accessed June 2024
  6. Healthline, ‘What’s the Link Between Dry Eye and Menopause’, 04/04/2024, Last Accessed June 2024
  7. Evergreen Eye Centre, ‘Can Hydration make a Difference if you Have Dry Eyes?’
  8. VISUfarma, Meibopatch®, Last Accessed June 2024
  9. VISUfarma, Naviblef®, Last Accessed June 2024
Back to news

Unexpected Dry Eye Symptoms to Watch Out For

Menopause marks a significant transition in a woman’s life, bringing a mix of challenges and transformations. As conversations about its impact on the body become more open and widespread, understanding this phase becomes increasingly crucial. 

 

The unexpected symptom of menopause

 

When thinking of the symptoms associated with menopause, we gravitate towards some of the more commonly known symptoms, such as hot flushes and changes in mood.[1] 

 

Having dry eyes often can be a sign that you are suffering with Dry Eye Syndrome, which can be a symptom of menopause.[2]

 

What is Dry Eye Syndrome?

 

Dry Eye Syndrome, also referred to as Dry Eye Disease, is a common condition that affects one in four people in the UK.[3]

 

When your tears fail to provide sufficient lubrication for your eyes, you might experience inflammation accompanied by various symptoms. These can include: 

 

  • Redness 
  • Itchy eyes 
  • Sensitivity to light 
  • A burning sensation 
  • In some cases, fatigue 

 

Symptoms are wide-ranging, so if you’re experiencing discomfort and irritation in your eyes, it may be Dry Eye Syndrome.[4] Find out more symptoms here. 

 

Why are dry eyes a symptom of menopause?

 

As menopause progresses, the levels of androgen hormones decrease, impacting the meibomian and lacrimal glands in the eyelids. The meibomian glands are responsible for producing the essential oils in tears. Consequently, a reduction in these oils leads to faster tear evaporation, resulting in drier eyes. 

 

Are dry eyes a common symptom of menopause?

 

You might feel alone with your Dry Eye symptoms, but it’s more common than you think for women to experience dry eyes during menopause. In fact, about 61% of perimenopausal and menopausal women are affected by Dry Eye Syndrome.[2]

 

While menopausal experiences differ greatly among individuals, and can be influenced by age, it’s important to recognise that your symptoms may not mirror those of your friends.[2]  

 

What other things can make Dry Eye worse?

 

Dry Eye Syndrome is a multifaceted condition with a variety of underlying causes, each contributing to its diverse symptoms. 

 

Several factors can trigger flare-ups, intensifying the discomfort of Dry Eye. Understanding these factors can help manage and potentially alleviate the symptoms. Here are some key elements that can worsen Dry Eye Syndrome: 

 

Smoke

Exposure to smoke can worsen your Dry Eye symptoms, causing increased burning, stinging, and scratchiness. To mitigate these issues, try to avoid cigarette smoke and fires. 

 

Going outside without your sunglasses

Unfortunately, this can also exacerbate Dry Eye symptoms. Your eyes need protection not only from the sun but also from the wind. 

 

We’re all guilty of choosing sunglasses based on their appearance but opt for ones that are also practical – that fit your face well and have side frames for extra protection. 

 

Looking at screens for too long

In today’s digital age, we spend a significant amount of time focused  on screens. Unfortunately, excessive screen time can worsen Dry Eye symptoms. Ensure you are taking regular breaks from your screens throughout the day 

 

Not blinking enough

It may sound silly, but make a conscious effort to blink more frequently, especially when you’re in front of a screen, reading, driving, or watching TV. When we’re deeply focused, our blink rate tends to decrease. 

 

Blinking is beneficial for your eyes as it helps spread your tears evenly across the surface, keeping them well-lubricated. 

 

Eating poorly

We all love a bit of chocolate and a packet of crisps, but it’s essential to maintain a balanced and nutritious diet for the sake of your eye health. 

 

In addition to enjoying your favourite snacks in moderation, ensure your diet includes a variety of nutrient-rich foods that support overall well-being, including the health of your eyes. 

 

Find out which vitamins are best for helping ease Dry Eye Syndrome symptoms here.[5]

 

 

Managing Dry Eye symptoms during menopause

 

Prioritising the health of your eyes becomes even more crucial when navigating conditions like Dry Eye, particularly during menopause. 

 

Making lifestyle changes can help manage your Dry Eye symptoms during menopause. 

 

As mentioned above, decreasing screen time and eating a nutritious diet are two lifestyle changes that can help with Dry Eye symptoms, some others could be: 

 

Use a humidifier

Enhancing the moisture levels in your home and workspace can provide considerable relief from Dry Eye discomfort. 

 

Avoiding contact lenses

Regularly wearing contact lenses can make dry eyes worse. Seek guidance from a healthcare professional to explore switching to glasses or specialised contact lenses tailored for dry eyes.[6]

 

Keep well hydrated

Drinking plenty of water not only keeps you feeling good but also helps to keep your eyes lubricated and moist. So, don’t forget to sip on that H2O throughout the day to keep your peepers happy and healthy![7]

 

Follow a three-step treatment plan

Following a three-step treatment plan is a great way to effectively manage your Dry Eye. 

 

Step 1: To kickstart relief, start by using a heated compress, such as MeiboPatch® to unblock your meibomian glands and ease eye discomfort. Ensure to lay this over your upper face so that it covers the bridge of your nose, upper and lower eyelids.[8]

 

Step 2: Clear away the melted oil obstructing your glands and any accumulated debris with a cleanser such as Naviblef®, specially designed to reduce discomfort. 

 

Step 3: Use an effective lubricant, such as eye drops or gels from our VISUfarma range. There you’ll find a product that will help ease your symptoms, depending on your condition.[9]

 

Looking for more information on Dry Eye and menopause?

 

To dive deeper into Dry Eye and menopause, check out our other insightful blogs on the topic. If you have any questions or need assistance, don’t hesitate to reach out to us. We’re here to support you on your journey to eye health and wellness. 

 

 

References

  1. NHS Inform, ‘Signs and Symptoms of Menopause’, 14/03/2023, Last Accessed June 2024
  2. Dry Eye Care Net, ‘What’s the Link Between Dry Eye and Menopause?’, 08/04/2021, Last Accessed June 2024
  3. Association of Optometrists, ‘Dry Eye Syndrome’, Last Accessed June 2024
  4. Dry Eye and Me, ‘Dry Eye Symptoms’, Last Accessed June 2024
  5. WebMD, ‘Are You Making Your Dry Eyes Worse?’, 03/12/2012, Last Accessed June 2024
  6. Healthline, ‘What’s the Link Between Dry Eye and Menopause’, 04/04/2024, Last Accessed June 2024
  7. Evergreen Eye Centre, ‘Can Hydration make a Difference if you Have Dry Eyes?’
  8. VISUfarma, Meibopatch®, Last Accessed June 2024
  9. VISUfarma, Naviblef®, Last Accessed June 2024
Back to news

Dry Eye and Menopause: What’s the Link?

During menopause, have you noticed that you’re struggling more with your vision or experiencing a lot of discomfort around your eyes? Don’t worry, you’re not the only one. In fact, there’s a link between menopause and Dry Eye disease.

Some studies suggest that around 61% of perimenopausal and menopausal women are affected by Dry Eye syndrome [1] , while a survey of 6,000 women revealed that one in four women said they experienced dry eyes, making it the second most common hidden menopause symptom. [2]

 

Woman with dry eye drinking water

What is Dry Eye?

Dry Eye syndrome is an extremely common eye condition affecting one in four people in the UK. [3] When your tears aren’t able to provide adequate lubrication for your eyes, you may notice inflammation in the eye which is related to a wide range of symptoms. You may experience red eyes, itching, a burning sensation, sensitivity to light, and even fatigue. Symptoms are wide-ranging, so if you’re experiencing discomfort and irritation in your eyes, it may be Dry Eye. [4]

 

Why Dry Eye?

There are several reasons you might start to show symptoms of Dry Eye disease. From smoking to aging, there are a lot of factors to consider but one you may not have thought about is your hormone levels.

During menopause your androgen hormones (which include testosterone) decrease. This hormone change affects the meibomian and lacrimal glands in the eyelids that provide the essential oils for tears. Tears moisten the eyes so you will see increased tear evaporation and drier eyes as a result.

Recent research shows that testosterone helps to manage the balance of tear production which you need to lubricate your eye. Without enough tear film, you may end up feeling an itchy, gritty, or stinging sensation – otherwise known as Dry Eye.

There is also some evidence that estrogen levels changing during this phase can also lead to Dry Eye disease. More research needs to be done to solidify this link but it would explain the increase in Dry Eye symptoms at different points of a woman’s monthly fertility cycle. [5]

One thing that’s clear, however, is that dry eyes can be a result of a sex hormone deficiency, meaning it’s a common side effect of menopause, when your hormone levels will drop.

 

couple laughing together

Is Dry Eye Disease a Common Menopause Symptom?

That gritty feeling in your eyes might make you feel like you’re all alone but don’t worry. Many people deal with Dry Eye disease every day and during menopause, it’s a very common symptom.

Menopausal symptoms vary depending on the person and their age, so you could end up facing very different symptoms and experiences from your friends. However, if you are noticing redder eyes, blurred vision, and excessive tearing then you might be dealing with hormonally-induced Dry Eye disease.

 

How do Hormones Play a Role?

During perimenopause and menopause, there’s a variety of changes in hormones that can be related to dry eye symptoms. We see a decrease in both estrogen and testosterone. Sex hormones are incredibly important to keep the ocular surface of the eye stable, which means they’ll affect producing tears, evaporating tears, draining tears, maintaining nerves behind the cornea, and maintaining the immune system of the eye. When it comes to Dry Eye the ability to keep the eyes moist (usually by tears) plays a large role. When the eyelid becomes dry and irritated , it causes pain, a burning sensation, and red eyes. [6]

During perimenopause, your sex hormone levels begin to drop and eventually, you’ll find you no longer have periods (the process we call the menopause).

After this your body entirely stops making progesterone and the production of estrogen and androgens decreases at a quicker rate, which is why we see the onset of these symptoms around this period of a woman’s life. [7]

 

Higher Risk Factors

One thing of note is that women who experience premature or early menopause (when the final menstrual period happens before the age of forty) are more at risk for androgen deficiency. [8]

Additionally, it may be worth considering the increased risk factor if you’ve been on estrogen tablets or the pill, have had surgical removal of the ovaries, or have suffered from an eating disorder that’s placed stress on the body. You can get tested for this deficiency, however, due to the levels naturally being so low in women, it’s difficult to do so.

If you’re looking into testing your levels to work out the cause of your Dry Eye disease then make sure you get your blood taken in the morning when testosterone levels are at their highest.

 

Hormone Replacement Therapy and Dry Eye Disease

Most doctors would recommend hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for alleviating particularly troublesome symptoms of menopause. Traditionally HRT replaces estrogen and progesterone which will fall during this period of a woman’s life. [9] However, HRT usually treats hot flashes, mood swings, and sleep issues rather than Dry Eye disease. You may be considering this treatment to soothe your dry eyes but unfortunately, research hasn’t yet proven the benefits of it.

While some studies show a small amount of improvement in the alleviation of symptoms, the largest cross-sectional study to date found that long-term use of HRT increases the risk of Dry Eye symptoms. Essentially the longer women stayed on hormone replacement therapy the worse and more frequent their Dry Eye symptoms became. [10]

So even if you were only experiencing mild Dry Eye symptoms during perimenopause, you may find that once you start treatment, you experience the onset of Dry Eye disease.

 

Woman rubbing her eyes

Treating Dry Eye During Menopause

With the effects of HRT in mind, it’s important to consider how your treatments of Dry Eye symptoms will impact your treatment of other menopausal symptoms, and visa versa. HRT can help alleviate some menopausal symptoms but research shows that the treatment can make Dry Eye Disease worse.

However, many usual recommendations for Dry Eye are lifestyle suggestions that may boost your overall health. Eating well, drinking enough water, and getting enough sleep can all help battle that dry, itchy feeling while decreasing screen time can boost your mood as well!

If you’re usually a fan of contact lenses, make sure you’re also grabbing those glasses every now and then to give your eyes a break. Hydrating eye drops in the mornings and evening can help soothe your eyes, and make sure you’re limiting stress where you can. [11]

If your dry eyes are chronic or causing large problems in your life the VISUshop site has a wide range of products for treatment and prevention you can check out here .

 

For more information on Dry Eye and Menopause, take a look at our other blogs on the subject, and what you can do to alleviate your dry, itchy eyes.

 

References

  1. ‘What’s the Link between Dry Eye and Menopause?’ Dryeyecare.net, 08/04/21, Last Accessed January 2024
  2. ‘Dry Eyes and Menopause Demystified’, Balance by Newson Health, 24/06/23, Last Accessed January 2024
  3. ‘Dry Eye Syndrome’, Association of Optometrists, Last Accessed January 2024
  4. ‘Dry Eye Symptoms’, Dry Eye and Me, Last Accessed January 2024
  5. Lazarus, Russel, ‘Dry Eye and Menopause’, Optometrists.org, 09/09/2020, Last Accessed January 2024
  6. Millar, Helen, ‘Dry Eyes and Menopause: What to Know’, Medical News Today, 18/09/23, Last Accessed January 2024
  7. ‘The Link Between Menopause and Dry Eye’, Slingsby & Huot Eye Associates, Last Accessed January 2024
  8. ‘Androgen Deficiency in Women’, Better Health Channel, Last Accessed January 2024
  9. ‘About Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT)’, NHS, Accessed January 2024
  10. Osborn, Corrinne, ‘Menopause and Dry Eyes: What’s the Link?’, Healthline, Last Accessed January 2024
  11. ‘Dry Eyes: The Unexpected Symptom of Perimenopause and Menopause’, The Latte Lounge, 26/09/22, Last Accessed January 2024
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Hay Fever Season: How to Fight Dry Eye When You Step Outside 

Hay Fever, dry eye disease, or something else entirely?

 

Are dry eyes ruining your morning run? Do you struggle on your commute? Scared to wear makeup now for fear of it streaming down your face by the time you step into the office? Don’t worry, you’re not alone – and this doesn’t need to be a constant battle. 

 

Dry Eye or hay fever?

 

Often, people find that dry eyes are worse in the morning or before they go to bed. The first step to tackling your health problems is to work out its root cause. It could be dry eye disease causing your troubles, or it could be hay fever and allergy symptoms. 

 

Hay fever and seasonal allergies affect everyone in different ways. When hay fever season starts up (usually late March to September) you’ll see the symptoms worsening. From sneezing fits, to a runny nose and dry itchy eyes, hay fever is caused by an allergy to pollen which is a common pollutant in the air. There is no current cure for hay fever, but you can take a medication called antihistamines to lessen its effect. [1]  

 

Field with butterflies

 

Some people do experience hay fever in the winter. This can be due to a number of reasons like living in a warmer climate where plants may not go dormant and therefore release pollen all year long. If you suffer from Allergic Rhinitis (which pollen is the most common cause of) you can also experience similar hay fever symptoms due to mould, pet dander, and even dust mites – all of which may feel worse due to being indoors more! Often people will mistake this for a common cold, but if you’re feeling itchy, think hay fever. If you’re feeling achy, think cold. 

 

It can be really tricky to work out if your symptoms are caused by dry eye disease or hay fever, but there are some key distinctions. If your dry eye symptoms improve in autumn and winter, it’s likely caused by a pollen allergy, rather than dry eye disease. Additionally, if you’ve also experienced cold-like symptoms such as a dry throat and runny nose, and you’re not experiencing a sensitivity to light or a gritty feeling in your eyes, it’s more likely to be hay fever and allergy symptoms. [2] 

 

Other conditions that could be causing your dry eye

 

If your dry eye symptoms hit before you’ve even had a chance to take a step out of the door though, then it’s time to consider other possible causes. Nocturnal Lagophthalmos can make it difficult to close your eye completely at night, leading to air exposure which worsens dry eye symptoms in the morning. [3] This condition has to be treated properly or it can lead to impaired vision. [4] 

 

Another possible explanation for painful, inflamed eyes in the morning is Blepharitis which is an inflammation along the edges of the eyelid. You may find your eyelids are crusty and itchy when you wake up, and you can even have issues opening your eyes. [5]

 

 

Other possible explanations for your dry eyes in the mornings

You may even find that certain medications that you take at bedtime can cause dry eye symptoms in the morning. Even antihistamines that you may take to lessen the symptoms of hay fever during the day can cause eyes to feel dry in the morning. [6]

 

Sleeping with air conditioning and heating units can also affect the way your eyes feel and your dry eye symptoms in the morning, as can your environment. [7] This can be a simple fix that will go a long way to improving your life. 

 

Many factors can cause dry, itchy, and even sore eyes when you wake up. Hormonal fluctuations and age can also contribute, so if you’ve noticed that you’re tearing up in the mornings more often as you approach your 60s, you’re not alone and you don’t need to worry. 

 

Luckily, many of the treatments for dry eye syndrome can soothe these symptoms and leave you feeling ready to start your day. 

 

Treating Dry Eye in the mornings 

 

If your symptoms most closely match dry eye and they worsen in the mornings then there are ways you can take action and treat it. Create a morning and evening routine that will help rather than harm. The hot air from hair dryers can worsen eye dryness so towel dry your hair instead. Use eye drops before bed to moisten your eyes. You can even wash your eyelids and use a warm compress if you’re looking to soothe chronic dry eye symptoms. [8]

 

Take a look at our 10 Tips To Ease Dry Eye at Night blog, as many of these tips will relieve symptoms the morning after as well. [9] 

 

Whether it’s hay fever and seasonal allergies, or dry eye disease, eye drops can definitely help you feel a little brighter and soothe painful, itchy eyes. VisuXL® Gel eye drops can lubricate your eyes for up to twelve hours using a thicker moisture barrier. Use them day and night! 

 

 

The best way to fight dry eyes when you step outside is good preparation. That includes working out what’s causing your irritation so you best know how to tackle it. To fight dry eyes in the morning a great routine for the morning and night will help relieve symptoms, as well as to make sure you’re supporting your overall eye health. Follow these tips for the hay fever season and beyond to feel ready to take on the day without dry eye disease bringing you down. 

 

We hope this article has answered your Dry Eye questions. However, if not please reach out to us on our socials, join our community on Facebook and Instagram, and discover more advice to help your eyes.

 

References

  1. NHS Inform, “Hay fever.”, Last Accessed November 2023.
  2. NI Direct, “Hay fever”, Last Accessed November 2023.
  3. Lazarus, Russel. “Why is Dry Eye Worse in the Mornings?” Optometrists.org, Last Accessed November 2023.
  4. Eye Clinic London, “Waking Up With Dry Eyes: Causes & Treatment.”, Last Accessed November 2023.
  5. Mayo Clinic, “Blepharitis – Symptoms & Causes.”, Last Accessed November 2023.
  6. Professional Vision | Ellicott City Eye Doctors, Eye Exam, Eyewear, “Why Are My Eyes Dry in the Morning?”, Last Accessed November 2023.
  7. A. Vogel, “3 Reasons you have Dry Eyes in the Morning.” Last Accessed November 2023.
  8. Griff, Ann Marie, “9 Tips for Your Daily Routine with Chronic Dry Eye”, Healthline, Last Accessed November 2023.
  9. Wang, Michael TM. “10 Tips to Ease Dry Eye at Night.” Dry Eye And Me, Last Accessed 6 November 2023.
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Can a Vegan Diet Improve Dry Eye Disease this Veganuary?

Are you thinking about taking part in Veganuary this year? Sufferers of dry eye are constantly on the lookout for solutions to their issues to ease their everyday irritation and pain. But could the secret lie within your diet? 

 

There’s plenty of research that proves there is a link between nutrition and eye health. When it comes to tackling symptoms of dry eye disease it’s important to take a look into your diet and what nutrients and vitamins you may be lacking. A vegan diet can be one of the most nutrient-rich and well-rounded diets in terms of its focus on plants and whole foods, meaning you can meet many of your nutritional needs without any animal products at all. This month is Veganuary, a yearly campaign that aims to get more people to try a vegan diet in January. Could trying it out this year help your eye health? The research suggests that it actually could! 

 

Woman with dry eyes holds her hand to her eye

 

Veganuary and a Plant-based Diet 

 

A plant-based diet focuses on vegetables, fruits, whole grains, beans, and legumes. That means often vegans eat far less processed foods than those who would eat a traditional British diet. Vegans don’t consume any animal products or any animal by-products which excludes meat, fish, dairy, eggs, and other foods from their diets altogether. It is entirely possible to get the right nutrition for eye health on a vegan diet through proper planning (just as any diet requires).[1] In fact, many medical professionals believe that it could be the best thing for those with dry eye disease as traditional medical advice for the disease is to lower protein, fat, and cholesterol intake.[2]

 

Hydration for Dry Eye

 

Plant-based diets rich in vegetables and fruits are often very rich in sources of hydration. Additionally, a focus on health with a plant-based diet can link to better habits for hydration overall. It’s been scientifically proven that staying hydrated through the day can ease the symptoms of dry eye disease – especially at night, making it easier to sleep and function through the day.[3] So if you’re bothered by irritated, itchy eyes then it’s time to start upping your hydration through both liquid intake and eating more fresh foods like watermelon, peaches, and cucumber (all suitable for a vegan diet!). Dry eye sufferers should be aiming to drink between eight and ten glasses of water a day.

 

Vitamins in a Vegan Diet 

 

However, a vegan diet offers much more than just hydration for dry eye sufferers. Studies show that dry eye can be improved with a proper diet – including a plant-based one.[4] One of the most important supplements to consider for your dry eyes is omega fatty acids. They can reduce inflammation in the eye, especially in the tear ducts that contribute to many dry eye symptoms. It’s also believed that omega-3 fatty acids can reduce dry eyes as they have an anti-inflammatory effect to help the cells in the retina and corneal heal after damage.[5] Most people see fish as their only source of omega-3s as salmon, halibut, herring, tuna, and molluscs like oysters are all rich in them. However, you can also get omega-3 from seeds like chia seeds and flax seeds, as well as some nuts.[6]

 

Woman rubbing her eyes, suffering from dry eye symptoms

 

When it comes to omega-3s there are three types to be aware of – ALA, EPA, and DHA. The body can convert ALA to EPA and DHA but the amount that’s converted is limited. ALA is a plant-based omega and can be found in many vegetables, seeds, and nuts. However, for adequate eye health, you should ensure you’re getting a good ratio of EPA and DHA. That means a vegan omega supplement might be a boost for your diet in the same way non-vegans often take fish oil as a supplement![7]

As well as omega-3 fatty acids, there are a few vitamins you should consider for your dry eye disease that a vegan diet can be super rich in. Lutein (often considered ‘the eye vitamin’) and zeaxanthin are antioxidants that can decrease the risk of cataracts and prevent eye diseases.[8] You can find lutein and zeaxanthin in leafy dark greens and avocados so grab your salad tongs and get eating. 

If you’ve heard anything about what foods are best for your eye health then you’ve probably heard you need to be eating your carrots. This is because carrots are particularly high in vitamin A content, as are sweet potatoes. Vitamin A helps to maintain a clear cornea, protecting and strengthening your eyes. 

Vitamin C can also help preserve eye health, fighting against dry eye which can develop as you age. Vitamin C is abundant in citrus fruits like oranges, grapefruits, and lemons as well as red peppers. 

If you’d like to find out more about what foods you should be including in your diet for optimal eye health you can check out our blog on the topic – read here. 

When it comes to the foods that are best for dry eyes, nearly every one of the recommended items can be found in a standard vegan diet, meaning you can easily take care of your dry eye disease while taking part in Veganuary. 

 

large bowl of fruit and vegetables as part of a vegan diet

 

Issues with a Plant-Based Diet for Dry Eye

 

As with any diet, a vegan diet lacking balance and adequate nutritional sources will result in ill health. A vegan diet in which you’re not taking into account nutritional needs and supplementation can also result in nutritional problems that can worsen eye health.[9] Vitamin A deficiency in particular can cause issues like xerophthalmia where eyes do not produce tears causing dry eyes. There can be many causes of malnutrition including eating disorders, malabsorption, and vegan or vegetarian diets where nutritional needs are not met.[10] So while you can see malnutrition within a vegan diet, that can be the case with any diet. 

Nowadays, many vegan products are fortified to ensure that all needs are met. It’s more difficult to meet calcium requirements when you forgo calcium-rich dairy foods from your diet by substituting with soy milk as many vegans do. However, there is fortified soy milk available now which can help you meet your requirements and with a proper diet plan to meet all nutritional requirements you can still optimise your health through a vegan diet. Low-fat dairy milk can provide 25% of your fairy calcium in an 8-ounce serving, whereas an 8-ounce serving of original soy milk can provide 35% of your daily calcium needs as well as 130% of vitamin B12 and 35% of calcium.[11]

B12 is a nutrient many people are deficient in – not just vegans. However, the only reliable source of B12 for a vegan diet are fortified foods so supplementing is recommended – especially as vitamin B12 has been shown to improve symptoms of dry eyes by repairing and preserving the corneal nerve layer.[12]

 

woman chopping yellow and red pepper

 

Veganuary and Your Dry Eye Disease 

 

A vegan diet is extremely rich in plant-based foods which are incredible for your eye health. When it comes to tackling your dry eyes some supplementation might be necessary but as long as your diet is considered and varied, you should be able to get all the hydration and vitamins needed to help heal and preserve your dry eyes – and you’ll probably find you’re eating more fresh fruit, vegetables, nuts, and seeds than ever before! As Dr Koetting from the American Optometric Association says, “All diets or eating habits can be done correctly or incorrectly. Knowing what you’re eating, what your body needs and how to make sure it’s in the diet is the important thing.”[13]

Try a month of eating vegan this 2024 for Veganuary and see how it impacts your health. For more information on how diet links to dry eye disease check out our blog on vitamins to boost eye health here.

 

References

  1. Ray, P, ‘Impact of a Vegan Diet on Visual Health’, Vision Science Academy, 01/03/2021, Accessed December 2021
  2. Gregor, M, ‘How to Treat Dry Eye Disease Naturally with Diet’, Nutrition Facts, 31/10/2017, Accessed December 2023
  3. Walsh, N, et al, ‘Is Whole-Body Hydration an Important Consideration in Dry Eye’, IOVS, September 2012, Vol.53, 6622-6627, Accessed December 2023
  4. Capogna, Laurie, ‘The Best Supplements for Dry Eye’, Eye Wellness, 13/07/2021, Accessed December 2023
  5. Dr Vegan, ‘7 Key Nutrients to Support your Eye Health’, Accessed December 2023
  6. Berg Feinfield Vision Correction, ‘6 Foods to Eat to Help Dry Eye’, 27/02/2020, Accessed December 2023
  7. Amandean, ‘Vegan Omega 3 for Dry Eyes’, 04/03/2022, Accessed December 2023
  8. Leighton’s Blog, ‘All-in for Veganuary 2022? The 5 Best Foods for your Eyesight’, 19/01/2022, Accessed December 2023
  9. Cirone, Cristina et al, ‘Linkage Between a Plant-based diet and Age-related diseases: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis’, Nutrition reviews, vol. 81.4, 10/03/2022, Accessed December 2023
  10. Medical News Today, ‘What To Know About Dry Eyes in Kids’, Accessed December 2023
  11. Gonna Need Milk, ‘Milk vs Soy Milk’, Accessed December 2023
  12. Gilbert Eyecare, ‘Should I Take Vitamins if I Have Dry Eye Syndrome’, Accessed December 2023
  13. American Optometric Association, ‘Vegan, Paleo, Gluten-free… Oh My!’, 11/07/2017, Accessed December 2023
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10 Tips to Ease Dry Eye at Night

Dry Eyes at night can be very problematic, causing eyes to be itchy and irritable. In this blog, we’ll be sharing our top tips to help your eyes.

These tips are:

  1. Use a warm compress before bed
  2. Stay hydrated
  3. Use a foam cleanser 
  4. Put a humidifier for dry eyes in your bedroom
  5. No phones before bed
  6. Wear moisture chamber goggles
  7. Follow a skin-care routine
  8. Avoid scented candles
  9. Wash your bedding regularly
  10. Use eye drops, like our VisuXL gel, before bed

What is Dry Eye?

Dry Eye Syndrome, or Dry Eye Disease, is a condition which affects 1 in 4 people in the UK.[1] Symptoms of Dry Eye can include dry, itchy, gritty, sore and watery eyes, as well as sensitivity to light and blurred vision.[2]

Causes of chronic Dry Eye Syndrome include age, gender, environment, eye surgery, lifestyle choices like smoking and drinking alcohol, and pre-existing conditions including diabetes and hypothyroidism.[3]

Dry Eye

Why do I have itchy, dry eyes at night?

Dry eyes can often get worse at night. In fact, some people even suffer from dry eyes only when sleeping.

There are multiple reasons why Dry Eye symptoms are worse at night. For example, some people experience nocturnal lagophthalmos, which is a condition where the eyelids are unable to close properly at night, exposing the eyes to dry air which can increase irritation and itching.[4]


Also, the body’s metabolism and blood circulation slow at night when you are asleep. Fewer nutrients reach your eyes, which means that your eyes can’t produce as many tears, which can lead to night-time dry eyes.[5]

There are other lifestyle factors like contact lenses and excess screen time during the day that can make you more likely to suffer from dry eyes at night.

 

Dry Eyes

Why do my eyes keep watering at night?

When we get into bed and lie down, our eyes can begin to water. This is because your tears cannot drain properly, with gravity no longer pushing your tears into your tear ducts.[6] This can also be linked to conditions such as nocturnal lagophthalmos.[4]

How to get rid of dry eyelids overnight:

It’s not just our eyes that can be negatively impacted on a night. Dry eyelids can be caused by skin conditions like dermatitis, as well as dry air and ageing.

To treat dry eyelids, it is best to see your doctor who may prescribe you allergy tested medication or other moisture based products to treat your condition.[7]

What can I do to reduce dry eyes at night?

Dry eyes at night can be prevented in a number of ways, to ensure that you have a great night’s sleep. Here are our top 10 tips to reduce night-time Dry Eye.

 

Woman in mask in bed

1. Use a warm compress before bed

Before bed, apply a warm compress to your eyes to help melt the oils blocking your Meibomian glands and minimise dry eye symptoms in the night.[8] This can help to stop your eyes from stinging at night, as the compress can provide a gentle and soothing eyelid massage.[9]

MeiboPatch® is an eye compress with a unique temperature test strip feature. This enables the compress to reach the perfect temperature and maintain the desired heat required to melt the meibomian glands. A regular flannel, on the other hand, rapidly loses heat and is therefore far less effective.[7][9]

Shop our MeiboPatch® today here.

 

Dry Eye

 2. Stay hydrated

This is a general rule of thumb for sufferers of dry eye, because staying well hydrated has been scientifically proven to help ease symptoms. Consistently drinking water throughout the day can therefore help to lessen the impact of symptoms at night.[10]

You should aim to drink between 8 and 10 glasses of water a day if you suffer from Dry Eye Syndrome.[11]
It is also a good idea to sleep with a glass of water by your bedside, in case you need rehydration during the night.

 

Foam

3. Use a foam cleanser 

After applying the compress and massaging your glands, you will need to clean away the secretions from your unblocked Meibomian glands and any dirt or irritants that have built up during the day.[12] For the best results, cleanse using the Naviblef ® Intensive Care eyelid foam or Naviblef ® Daily Care foam to cleanse the eyes, as they are non-greasy and non-irritant.[13]

Cleansing using an optimal foam formulation is a great way to ease itchy eyes at night, with purified water being the main ingredient in many products.[14] Purified water has been cleansed of organic irritants, which makes it incredibly safe for the eyes.[15]

You can shop our range of foam cleansers here.

 

Dry Eye

 4. Put a humidifier for dry eyes in your bedroom 

By turning on a humidifier in your room at night, you fill the air with moisture and protect your eyes from potential dryness.  Humidifiers protect your tear film from damage.

A 2017 study by Michael T.M. Wang found that humidifiers helped Dry Eye in people that spend a lot of time at a computer screen.[16] Therefore, humidifiers should make a positive difference to those suffering from dry eyes at night. This is a brilliant and cost-effective home remedy. 

A 2018 study about the right environment for optimum sleep found that a controlled humidity of between 40 and 60% is best.[17] Any higher than this can increase the risk of black mould in your bedroom, which releases mycotoxins which can impact night-time Dry Eye.[18]

For more tips on how to help your Dry Eye, visit our lifestyle blog.

 

Phone in bed

5. No phones before bed

The National Sleep Foundation recommends that you should stop using electronic devices, such as your phone, at least 30 minutes before you go to sleep.[19] This is because they give your brain too much stimulation to switch off, affecting your sleep.

In the same way, too much screen time can cause Computer Vision Syndrome, which can lead to Dry Eye and stinging eyes at night. This is because blinking helps cover the eyes with a tear film, but when we look at digital devices we blink less often.[20]

These two factors combined mean that phones should be avoided before bedtime to prevent night-time Dry Eye. For more information on Computer Vision Syndrome, visit our blog.

 

Glasses

6. Wear moisture chamber goggles

You may not have thought of wearing glasses in bed, but the right ones can actually help stop your eyes stinging at night. Wearing moisture chamber goggles or wrap-around glasses can help to reduce the evaporation of your tears.

Many people choose to wear soft moisture chamber goggles, as they are comfortable for a good night’s sleep. Just make sure that if you do use these, you sleep on your back to stop them pressing into your face.[21]

Contact-lens wearers should also make sure that they remove them before bed, to avoid making your eyes sting at night. This also allows your eyes to rehydrate before you shut them through the night.[22]

 

Woman cleaning face

7. Follow a skin-care routine

You should always remove your makeup before you go to bed, to avoid it going into your eyes in your sleep.[23]

You should also avoid makeup removers, moisturisers and skincare that include:

  • Alcohol
  • Parabens
  • Oil
  • Retinol
  • Phenoxyethanol
  • Acetyl hexapeptide-3
  • Benzalkonium chloride (BAK or BAC)
  • Butylene glycol, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)
  • Formaldehyde and formaldehyde donors
  • Isopropyl cloprostenate[24]

For this reason, it is a good idea to read the labels on your products before using them. For more tips on cosmetics for Dry Eyes, read our blog.

 

Candles

 8. Avoid scented candles

Although scented candles can be incredibly relaxing, they can also cause stinging and itchy eyes at night. This is because of chemicals often used in fragrance like acetone, Linalool and benzaldehyd. If you are looking to add ambience into your bedroom, you should opt for unscented beeswax candles with a cotton wick.[25]

For this reason, you should also avoid fragranced pillow mists and air fresheners that include these ingredients. In particular, pillow mists can rub directly into your eyes, causing stinging eyes at night.

 

Woman using washing machine

9. Wash your bedding regularly

Washing bedding is something that we all do – but did you know that it can help to soothe dry eyes at night? Washing your bedding can remove allergens like dust, pet hair and pollen, all of which can irritate your eyes.[12]

The National Sleep Foundation recommends that you wash your bedsheets at least once a week. You should do this even more often if you have a condition such as Dry Eye Syndrome.[26]

You should also choose your laundry detergent and softener wisely. These can make your eyes itchy and watery due to chemicals like ethanol, sodium silicate and bleach.[25] Therefore, you should look at the ingredients on these items before you wash your bedding with them.

 

Eye drops for Dry Eyes

10. Use eye drops before bed

Using night eye drops for dry eyes straight before you go to sleep protects your eyes from drying out whilst you rest. Dry Eye gel can also be helpful on a night, as they can often cause blurry vision when applied. Therefore, you can sleep while they work their magic.

VisuXL Gel eye drops provide 12-hour protection from Dry Eye symptoms, giving you a full night of sleep.[27] It’s a lubricating eye drop which turns into a gel when it hits the surface of your eye, maintaining residence time to provide lasting relief.[28]  

 

For more information about VisuXL Gel and other treatments to relieve Dry Eyes at night, visit the VISUfarma Website.


We hope that you have enjoyed this blog about Dry Eyes at night. To find out more about Dry Eye, join our community and follow our social channels.

 

In most cases, the best way to treat dry eyes, Also known as dry eye syndrome, is to use eye gel or eye drops.

VisuXL Gel® is a preservative-free smart gel lubricant for dry eye syndrome. It provides comfort in a bottle with it’s long-lasting lubrication properties giving 12-hour dosing with just one drop and is suitable for both day and night use.

VisuXL® is a preservative-free eye drop lubricant for dry eye syndrome. Due to its unique ingredients, VisuXL® will help you recover from eye surgery, an injury or persistent damaging dry eye.

VisuEvo® is a preservative-free eye drop that prevents excessive evaporation of the tear film. Its unique formula contains omega-3 essential fatty acids, Vitamins A and D and ultra-filtered phospholipids that facilitate tear film presentation and control evaporation.

All three products are contact lens-friendly and can be used for 180 days after opening.

Shop now

 

References

  1. Association of Optometrists, ‘Dry Eye Syndrome’. Accessed May 2022.
  2. NHS, ‘Dry Eyes’, Healthline, 01/04/2020. Accessed May 2022.
  3. Not a Dry Eye, ‘Causes’. Accessed May 2022.
  4. Latkany, Robert, Lock, Barbara, and Speaker, Mark, ‘Nocturnal lagophthalmos: an overview and classification’, The Ocular Surface, 2006 Jan;4(1):44-53. Accessed May 2022.
  5. Lazarus, Russell, ‘Burning Eyes at Night’ Optometrists Network, 06/02/21. Accessed May 2022.
  6. Leela Raju, ‘What Can Cause Your Eyes to Water When You’re Lying Down?’, Healthline. Accessed November 2022.
  7. Natalie Silver, HealthLine, ‘Why Do My Eyelids Feel Dry?’, 08/12/21. Accessed December 2022.
  8. Baumann A, Cochener B, [Meibomian gland dysfunction: a comparative study of modern treatments]. Journal francais d’ophtalmologie, 2014; 37(4): 303-12. Accessed May 2022.
  9. MeiboPatch® Instructions for Use (IFU). Accessed May 2022.
  10. Walsh, Neil. Fortes, Matthew. Raymond-Barker, Phillipa. et al, ‘Is Whole-Body Hydration an Important Consideration in Dry Eye’, IOVS, September 2012, Vol.53, 6622-6627. Accessed May 2022.
  11. Complete Eye Care, ‘How Does Hydration Affect My Eyes’, Accessed Sep 2021.
  12. Lovering, Cathy, ‘Why You Have Dry Eyes at Night and How to Soothe Them’, Healthline, 15/01/2021. Accessed August 2021.
  13. Naviblef ® Daily Care and Naviblef ® Intensive Care instructions for use (IFU). Accessed May 2022.
  14. Sharita Hanley, ‘What to Know About Eyewash Solutions’, WebMD, 09/11/22. Accessed November 2022.
  15. Katey Davidson, ‘Purified Water vs. Spring Water: Which Is Better?’, 23/08/21. Accessed November 2022.
  16. Michael T.M Wang et al, Randomized Trial of Desktop Humidifier for Dry Eye Relief in Computer Users. Optometry and Vision Science: November 2017 – Volume 94 – Issue 11 – p 1052-1057. Accessed November 2022.
  17. Zachary A. Caddick, Kevin Gregory, Lucia Arsintescu, Erin E. Flynn-Evans, ‘A review of the environmental parameters necessary for an optimal sleep environment, Building and Environment, Volume 132, 2018, Pages 11-20. Accessed November 2022.
  18. Charmley, Sarah, ‘Can humidifiers reduce dry eye symptoms?’, MedicalNewsToday, 30/01/2022. Accessed November 2022.
  19. SCL Health, ‘Why It’s Time to Ditch the Phone Before Bed’. Accessed November 2022.
  20. Wheeler, Regina Boyle. ‘Dry Eye and Screen Use’, WebMD, 21/06/21, Accessed April 2022.
  21. Not a Dry Eye, ‘Moisture Chamber Goggles’. Accessed November 2022.
  22. Lentiamo, ‘Can you sleep with contacts in?’. Accessed November 2022.
  23. HealthLine, ‘Eye Makeup and Dry Eyes: The Inside Scoop’, 07/09/21. Accessed October 2022.
  24. Wells, Jennifer, ‘Dry, Irritated Eyes? Avoid These Hidden Ingredients in Your Beauty and Skincare Products’, Midwest Eye Consultants, 30/10/20. Accessed November 2022.
  25. Laurier Optical Orleans Innes Eye Clinic, ‘These 10 Household Items Could Be Irritating Your Eyes’. Accessed November 2022.
  26. Noyed, Daniel, ‘How Often Should You Wash Your Sheets?’, Sleep Foundation, 11/03/22,
  27. Brancato R, Fiore T, Papucci L, et al, ‘Concomitant Effect of Topical Ubiquinone Q10 and Vitamin E to Prevent Keratocyte Apoptosis After Excimer Laser Photoablation in Rabbits’, J Refract Surg 2002; 18: 135-9. † In an animal model. Accessed May 2022.
  28. VisuXL Gel Instructions For Use (IFU). Accessed May 2022.

 

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Dry Eye and Mental Health

Dry Eye Disease impacts not only our physical health but also our mental health.[1] If you’re experiencing some of the negative mental effects of Dry Eye, you’re not alone. In this blog, we’ll be sharing how Dry Eye is linked to your mental health and some ways you can cope with this.

 

Can Dry Eyes be psychological?

There is strong evidence to suggest that Dry Eye Disease can have implications for mental health. A study by Marko Toth in the Journal of Health Psychology and Behavioural Medicine found that symptoms of Dry Eye can be associated with depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder.[2]

There have been numerous other studies done to explore the effects of Dry Eye Disease on Mental Health. For example, a study in the BMJ Open has found that 47% of patients with Dry Eye Disease have mental health difficulties.[3] This is a very worrying statistic and our community is here to support you.

 

Two hands clasped together

 

How can Dry Eyes impact depressive feelings?

In a study by the European Journal of Ophthalmology, 40% of people with Dry Eye had depression.[1] The symptoms of Dry Eye, such as dry and itchy eyes, can have a negative impact on everyday life and make us feel isolated.

 

Can anxiety cause Dry Eye syndrome?

In the study by the European Journal of Ophthalmology, 39% of people suffered from anxiety.[1] Dry Eye Disease can cause us a lot of worry and unease, especially as it can make us feel so disorientated.

 

Woman with hot drink

 

How can I deal with Dry Eye and mental health?

There are a number of things you can do to help your mental health if you are suffering from Dry Eye Disease. Read below to find out more. 

 

Hand turning away wine

 

Drink less alcohol

Mental health problems and alcohol are closely linked because of how it affects our brain and body.[4] Drinking alcohol is also bad for Dry Eye as it increases the sugar levels in your blood. This causes your eyes to swell, meaning your vision can become blurry.[5] Therefore, drinking less can have a positive effect on both your physical and mental health. For more information on alcohol and Dry Eye, visit our blog.

 

Man and woman running

 

Make sure you exercise

The charity, Mind UK, argues that physical exercise can help with mental health issues.[6] If you exercise outdoors, it’s a good idea to wear a pair of wrap-around glasses, which can protect your eyes from windy conditions.[7]

 

Woman making salad

 

Eat healthily

Another strategy to help with your mental health is to eat healthily.[8] This also has benefits for Dry Eye Disease sufferers, as there are certain vitamins that are good for your eyes. For the full list of vitamins to take for Dry Eye, read this blog.

For more information on mental health, please visit the NHS website and consider a service such as Mind.

 

In most cases, the best way to treat dry eyes, Also known as dry eye syndrome, is to use eye gel or eye drops.

VisuXL Gel® is a preservative-free smart gel lubricant for dry eye syndrome. It provides comfort in a bottle with it’s long-lasting lubrication properties giving 12-hour dosing with just one drop and is suitable for both day and night use.

VisuXL® is a preservative-free eye drop lubricant for dry eye syndrome. Due to its unique ingredients, VisuXL® will help you recover from eye surgery, an injury or persistent damaging dry eye.

VisuEvo® is a preservative-free eye drop that prevents excessive evaporation of the tear film. Its unique formula contains omega-3 essential fatty acids, Vitamins A and D and ultra-filtered phospholipids that facilitate tear film presentation and control evaporation.

All three products are contact lens-friendly and can be used for 180 days after opening.

Shop now

 

References

  1. Denise Myshko. ‘Analysis Assesses Relationship Between Dry Eye Disease and Psychiatric Disorders’, Managed Healthcare Executive, 07/08/22. Accessed November 2022
  2. Marko Toth, Nataša Jokić-Begić. ‘Psychological contribution to understanding the nature of dry eye disease: a cross-sectional study of anxiety sensitivity and dry eyes’, Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine, 1(8) 202-119, 28/05/20. Accessed November 2022
  3. Parwez Hossain et al. ‘Patient-reported burden of dry eye disease in the UK: a cross-sectional web-based survey’, BMJ Open, BMJ Journals, 11 (3), 04/03/21. Accessed November 2022
  4. Mental Health Foundation, ‘Alcohol and mental health’, 16/02/22. Accessed November 2022.
  5. Ferrier & Mackinnon Optometrists, ‘Dry January, Not So Dry Eyes’. Accessed November 2022
  6. Mind, ‘Physical activity and your mental health’. Accessed November 2022.
  7. Nall, Rachel. ‘Treating (and Preventing) Dry Eyes in Winter’, Healthline, 30/09/20. Accessed November 2022.
  8. Sutter Health, ‘Eating Well for Mental Health’. Accessed November 2022.
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