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Unexpected Dry Eye Symptoms to Watch Out For

You may believe that to have Dry Eye disease, the symptoms you should be looking out for are dry, itchy or irritated eyes. However, the symptoms can be more complex than this, and you may be experiencing Dry Eye without realising it. 

 

What is Dry Eye Disease?

 

Dry Eye Disease is a very common condition. ¼ of all people suffer from the condition in the UK. [1] Across the world, it affects tens of millions of people. [2]

 

Dry Eye can appear in several forms. Aqueous Deficient Dry Eye is when inflammation in your lacrimal gland prevents it from producing enough aqueous tears.

Evaporative Dry Eye is caused by Meibomian Gland Dysfunction where the glands that produce the outer, oily layer of your tear film don’t work properly. This means your tears aren’t able to adequately lubricate your eye.

Mixed Dry Eye is a combination of aqueous tear deficiency and tear instability, meaning your eyes produce fewer tears and the tears that are produced have an unstable tear film. [2]

 

Other conditions can also cause many Dry Eye symptoms so it’s important to talk to your GP if you’re worried.

 

Close up shot of woman's eye watering

The Dry Eye symptoms you may be familiar with 

 

You could have Dry Eye if you are experiencing:

 

  • A scratchy feeling, like there’s something in your eye 
  • Stinging or burning feelings in your eye 
  • Red eyes 
  • Sore or aching eyes 
  • The feeling of sand or grit in your eyes 
  • Blurry vision [3]

 

But there is a more expansive list of symptoms that you may not have considered. Keep reading to learn what these are and what you can do if you believe you’re struggling with this condition. 

 

Unexpected and unusual symptoms of Dry Eye

 

As well as the feeling of dry, itchy, discomfort in your eyes, you might experience several different symptoms.

 

Watery Eyes

It might sound contradictory, but excess tears and watery eyes can also be a symptom of Dry Eye disease. The condition is caused by a lack of quality tears – not an absence of the production of them. This means that when the eye is not lubricated well enough and becomes dry, tear production can be overstimulated leading to watery eyes. [4] You might notice a similar response in situations like the cold or wind when the ends tend to water more. [5]

 

Unlike when you suffer a cold or an injury, excess tears are produced with Dry Eye because when the meibomian glands are producing enough oils for the outer layer of the tear film, the middle layer of your tear film evaporates too quickly. This causes the lacrimal glands to make more tears to compensate. However, without the oil the tears aren’t able to coat your eye, meaning they remain dry. [2]

 

However, watery eyes can also be caused by blocked tear ducts, an allergy, Bell’s Palsy, or other conditions so it’s important to protect your eyes, monitor the condition, and reach out to your GP if your eyes watering is affecting your everyday activity. [5]

 

Red Eyelid Rims

If you’re noticing redness on your eye margins or small bumps, you should be aware that it could be an indication of Dry Eye. Red eyelid rims can be signs of Blepharitis or Meibomian Gland Dysfunction, which can cause Dry Eye disease. It’s important not to ignore this sign and to seek help or treatment as Blepharitis can lead to blurred vision. [6]

 

Puffy Eyes

Most people will experience puffiness in their eye area at certain times. Allergies, poor sleep, and poor diet can all cause temporary puffiness. However, in combination with other symptoms, it might be a sign of Blepharitis – inflammation along the edge of the eyelid. [7]

 

This condition has been associated closely with Dry Eye disease. Find out more about Blepharitis and Dry Eye in our article – read the blog here

 

Light Sensitivity 

Are you feeling particularly sensitive to the sun in the morning? Can’t look at a TV with full brightness? A sensitivity to light (photophobia) can actually be a symptom of Dry Eye Disease. [8]

 

The uncomfortable or sometimes painful response to sunlight or indoor lighting can be caused by eye irritation. Dry Eye irritates your eyes, making them more susceptible to reactions like this.

 

If light sensitivity is affecting your life, consider wearing sunglasses more frequently outdoors, and see your optician to discuss your optical health.

 

Eyelid Twitching

If you’re feeling twitchy – don’t panic. While eyelid twitching can be irritating it is a common condition. Eyelid Myokymia can be triggered by dry and irritated eyes, meaning it can often be a symptom of Dry Eye disease.

 

Ocular Fatigue

Ocular fatigue or eye strain is primarily associated with activities like reading, writing, driving, playing video games, or staring at screens. [9] However, it also has a very strong correlation with Dry Eye. One study showed that 51.4% of patients who reported symptoms of ocular fatigue were also diagnosed as having Dry Eye with symptoms. [10]

 

Close up shot of woman rubbing eyes with hands

No Symptoms

This unexpected symptom of Dry Eye might seem confusing, but some patients with Dry Eye disease exhibit no symptoms at all. Advanced technology can actually identify, diagnose, and treat Dry Eye before patients start exhibiting symptoms. [6]

 

Can Dry Eye symptoms come and go

 

When it comes to Dry Eye you may notice that certain times are worse for your symptoms than others. These are called flare-ups. You may notice a worsening of your symptoms during different seasons, in certain environments, or even just if you’ve been exposed to an allergen. 

 

The symptoms you’re experiencing can also change over time. It’s important to keep an eye on what symptoms you’re experiencing, in case they’re related to a more serious condition as certain eye problems can impair your vision. [11]

 

Dry Eye disease can be a chronic condition for many people. Symptoms may improve with treatment but flare-ups will continue to occur throughout your life. For others though it can be temporary. After making lifestyle adjustments like refraining from extended computer use and stopping smoking, you might notice symptoms disappear over time. [11]

 

While Dry Eye symptoms can be varied, it’s usually a very manageable condition. With the right treatment like hydrating eye drops, you can relieve symptoms easily and live a very fulfilling life. 

 

If you’d like more advice on Dry Eye, feel free to reach out to our community on Instagram (@dryeyeandme) and Facebook (Dry Eye and Me) or get in touch with us. 

If you’re looking for products to aid with your Dry Eye symptoms then visit VISUshop which has a wide range of eye drops and other products to help improve your health and wellbeing – https://visushop.co.uk/

 

References

  1. Visual Answers Optometrists, ‘Dry Eye’, Last Accessed February 2024
  2. Cleveland Clinic, ‘Dry Eye’, Last Accessed February 2024
  3. Dry Eye and Me, ‘Dry Eye Symptoms’, Last Accessed February 2024
  4. Premier Health, ‘Strangely Enough, Teary Eyes a Sign of Dry Eye’, 21/12/21, Last Accessed February 2024
  5. NHS, ‘Watering Eyes’, Last Accessed February 2024
  6. Koutsokeras, Alex, ‘15 Unusual Signs and Symptoms of Dry Eyes’, 05/04/2022, Last Accessed February 2024
  7. Mayo Clinic, ‘Blepharitis’, 10/05/2022, Last Accessed February 2024
  8. Specsavers, ‘Photophobia (Light Sensitivity), Last Accessed February 2024
  9. Ansorge, Rick, ‘13 Tips to prevent Eye Fatigue’, 21/02/21, Last Accessed February 2024
  10. Toda, I, et al, ‘Ocular Fatigue is the Major Symptom of Dry Eye’, Act Ophthalmologica vol, 71,3 (1993), Last Accessed February 2024
  11. Cafasso, Jacquelyn, ‘Your FAQs, Answered: Can Dry Eyes Be Cured?’, 29/06/23, Last Accessed February 2024
Back to news

Dry Eye and Sjögren’s Syndrome

Did you know that approximately one in ten patients with Dry Eye Disease also have Sjögren’s syndrome?[1] If you have both conditions, we’re here to support you. In this blog, we’ll be exploring the relationship between the two conditions and how you can treat them.

What is Sjögren’s syndrome?

Sjögren’s syndrome is an autoimmune condition, meaning that instead of protecting the body from abnormal cells, the immune system starts attacking healthy cells and tissue.[2] In this case, it affects the parts of the body that create fluids, like tears and saliva.[3] The condition can occur on its own or with other diseases linked to the immune system, like rheumatoid arthritis, which can cause dry eyes.[4] For more information on this condition, visit our blog: Rheumatoid Arthritis and Dry Eye

couple laughing together

How are Sjögren’s syndrome and Dry Eye Disease linked?

Sjögren’s syndrome usually appears in people aged 40-60.[3] As with Dry Eye Syndrome, it is much more common in women than men, with women nine times more likely to have Sjögren’s syndrome.[3][4] While there isn’t yet a definitive answer as to why Sjögren’s syndrome affects women more than men, researchers believe it could be linked to the hormone estrogen. Estrogen levels drop after menopause, which aligns with the ages that Sjögren’s syndrome appears.[5] To find out more about dry eyes and menopause, visit our blog: 5 Things You Need to Know About Menopause and Dry Eye

Overall, Sjögren’s syndrome and Dry Eye Disease are linked because of the immune system’s attack on tear glands. It limits the production of tears that would usually add moisture to your eyes, resulting in dry eyes.[6] Read on to find out more about the symptoms of Sjögren’s syndrome and dry eyes.

 

a dry eye

What are the symptoms of Sjögren’s syndrome and dry eyes?

There are a whole host of Sjögren’s syndrome symptoms to look out for! These include:

  • Dry eyes
  • Dry mouth
  • Dry skin
  • Tiredness
  • Vaginal dryness
  • Muscle or joint pain
  • Swollen salivary glands
  • Rashes [3]

a woman struggling with dry eye disease at a desk

Because of the lack of tears being produced, people might notice Dry Eye symptoms such as:

  • Itchy eyes
  • Burning eyes
  • Aching eyes
  • Eyes feel heavy
  • Eyes feel sore
  • Eyes feel gritty or sandy
  • Eyes are red
  • Eyes are blurry
  • Feeling fatigued

For more symptoms of dry eyes, visit our web page: Symptoms of Dry Eye

How do you treat dry eyes and Sjögren’s syndrome?

There is no cure for Sjögren’s syndrome, but there are treatments that can help alleviate symptoms.[3] Follow these steps:

 

Stay hydrated

woman with dry eye drinking a glass of water

Adding more water to your body is a great way to combat dry eyes. Experts recommend drinking eight to 10 glasses of water a day to keep your body completely hydrated.[7] To help you do this, buy a labelled water bottle or keep a note of how much water you are drinking per day.

Avoid alcohol

a cold beer

Drinking alcohol is bad for dry eyes and Sjögren’s syndrome as it can dehydrate your body. As both conditions already do this, symptoms are intensified. Click here for more information: Is Drinking Alcohol Bad For Your Eyes?

Eat well

fresh berries

What you eat can affect your eyes and health in general. You can support yourself by adding vitamins and minerals into your diet, such as Vitamin A, E and C.[8] Read more about eye health: 6 Vitamins for Dry Eyes

Consider moisture chamber goggles

man wearing moisture chamber goggles

Did you know wearing glasses can reduce tear evaporation by up to 30%? This can be maximised by wearing moisture chamber goggles.[2] These can be worn in the day, but it’s also a good idea to sleep in them. Find out more here: 10 Tips to Ease Dry Eye at Night

Use eye drops

a woman with dry eyes using eye drops

Lubricating your eyes is one of the best ways to treat dry eyes and Sjögren’s syndrome. To find out whether you should opt for eye drops or eye gel for dry eyes, read this useful resource: Eye Drops vs Eye Gel for the Treatment of Dry Eyes

 

For more information about conditions related to dry eyes, visit our blog: 6 Conditions that Cause Dry Eye.

 

In most cases, the best way to treat dry eyes, Also known as dry eye syndrome, is to use eye gel or eye drops.

VisuXL Gel® is a preservative-free smart gel lubricant for dry eye syndrome. It provides comfort in a bottle with it’s long-lasting lubrication properties giving 12-hour dosing with just one drop and is suitable for both day and night use.

VisuXL® is a preservative-free eye drop lubricant for dry eye syndrome. Due to its unique ingredients, VisuXL® will help you recover from eye surgery, an injury or persistent damaging dry eye.

VisuEvo® is a preservative-free eye drop that prevents excessive evaporation of the tear film. Its unique formula contains omega-3 essential fatty acids, Vitamins A and D and ultra-filtered phospholipids that facilitate tear film presentation and control evaporation.

All three products are contact lens-friendly and can be used for 180 days after opening.

Shop now

 

References

  1. Akpek EK, Bunya VY, Saldanha IJ. ‘Sjögren’s Syndrome: More Than Just Dry Eye’, Cornea, National Library of Medicine, 2019 May;38(5):658-661. Accessed July 2023.
  2. NHS Inform, ‘Sjogren’s syndrome’, 23/02/2023. Accessed July 2023.
  3. NHS, ‘Sjögren’s syndrome’, 21/04/2020. Accessed July 2023.
  4. Women’s Health Research Institute, ‘Sjogren’s Syndrome More Common in Women’. Accessed July 2023.
  5. Arthritis Foundation, ‘Sjögren’s syndrome’. Accessed July 2023.
  6. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, ‘Sjögren’s Syndrome’, 01/2021. Accessed July 2023.
  7. Complete Eye Care, ‘How Does Hydration Affect My Eyes?’. Accessed July 2023.
  8. Meixner, M. ‘The 9 Most Important Vitamins for Eye Health’, 16/02/2023. Accessed July 2023.
Back to news

Nocturnal Lagophthalmos and Dry Eye

Did you know that approximately one in ten patients with Dry Eye Disease also have Sjögren’s syndrome?[1] If you have both conditions, we’re here to support you. In this blog, we’ll be exploring the relationship between the two conditions and how you can treat them.

What is Sjögren’s syndrome?

Sjögren’s syndrome is an autoimmune condition, meaning that instead of protecting the body from abnormal cells, the immune system starts attacking healthy cells and tissue.[2] In this case, it affects the parts of the body that create fluids, like tears and saliva.[3] The condition can occur on its own or with other diseases linked to the immune system, like rheumatoid arthritis, which can cause dry eyes.[4] For more information on this condition, visit our blog: Rheumatoid Arthritis and Dry Eye

couple laughing together

How are Sjögren’s syndrome and Dry Eye Disease linked?

Sjögren’s syndrome usually appears in people aged 40-60.[3] As with Dry Eye Syndrome, it is much more common in women than men, with women nine times more likely to have Sjögren’s syndrome.[3][4] While there isn’t yet a definitive answer as to why Sjögren’s syndrome affects women more than men, researchers believe it could be linked to the hormone estrogen. Estrogen levels drop after menopause, which aligns with the ages that Sjögren’s syndrome appears.[5] To find out more about dry eyes and menopause, visit our blog: 5 Things You Need to Know About Menopause and Dry Eye

Overall, Sjögren’s syndrome and Dry Eye Disease are linked because of the immune system’s attack on tear glands. It limits the production of tears that would usually add moisture to your eyes, resulting in dry eyes.[6] Read on to find out more about the symptoms of Sjögren’s syndrome and dry eyes.

 

a dry eye

What are the symptoms of Sjögren’s syndrome and dry eyes?

There are a whole host of Sjögren’s syndrome symptoms to look out for! These include:

  • Dry eyes
  • Dry mouth
  • Dry skin
  • Tiredness
  • Vaginal dryness
  • Muscle or joint pain
  • Swollen salivary glands
  • Rashes [3]

a woman struggling with dry eye disease at a desk

Because of the lack of tears being produced, people might notice Dry Eye symptoms such as:

  • Itchy eyes
  • Burning eyes
  • Aching eyes
  • Eyes feel heavy
  • Eyes feel sore
  • Eyes feel gritty or sandy
  • Eyes are red
  • Eyes are blurry
  • Feeling fatigued

For more symptoms of dry eyes, visit our web page: Symptoms of Dry Eye

How do you treat dry eyes and Sjögren’s syndrome?

There is no cure for Sjögren’s syndrome, but there are treatments that can help alleviate symptoms.[3] Follow these steps:

 

Stay hydrated

woman with dry eye drinking a glass of water

Adding more water to your body is a great way to combat dry eyes. Experts recommend drinking eight to 10 glasses of water a day to keep your body completely hydrated.[7] To help you do this, buy a labelled water bottle or keep a note of how much water you are drinking per day.

Avoid alcohol

a cold beer

Drinking alcohol is bad for dry eyes and Sjögren’s syndrome as it can dehydrate your body. As both conditions already do this, symptoms are intensified. Click here for more information: Is Drinking Alcohol Bad For Your Eyes?

Eat well

fresh berries

What you eat can affect your eyes and health in general. You can support yourself by adding vitamins and minerals into your diet, such as Vitamin A, E and C.[8] Read more about eye health: 6 Vitamins for Dry Eyes

Consider moisture chamber goggles

man wearing moisture chamber goggles

Did you know wearing glasses can reduce tear evaporation by up to 30%? This can be maximised by wearing moisture chamber goggles.[2] These can be worn in the day, but it’s also a good idea to sleep in them. Find out more here: 10 Tips to Ease Dry Eye at Night

Use eye drops

a woman with dry eyes using eye drops

Lubricating your eyes is one of the best ways to treat dry eyes and Sjögren’s syndrome. To find out whether you should opt for eye drops or eye gel for dry eyes, read this useful resource: Eye Drops vs Eye Gel for the Treatment of Dry Eyes

 

For more information about conditions related to dry eyes, visit our blog: 6 Conditions that Cause Dry Eye.

 

In most cases, the best way to treat dry eyes, Also known as dry eye syndrome, is to use eye gel or eye drops.

VisuXL Gel® is a preservative-free smart gel lubricant for dry eye syndrome. It provides comfort in a bottle with it’s long-lasting lubrication properties giving 12-hour dosing with just one drop and is suitable for both day and night use.

VisuXL® is a preservative-free eye drop lubricant for dry eye syndrome. Due to its unique ingredients, VisuXL® will help you recover from eye surgery, an injury or persistent damaging dry eye.

VisuEvo® is a preservative-free eye drop that prevents excessive evaporation of the tear film. Its unique formula contains omega-3 essential fatty acids, Vitamins A and D and ultra-filtered phospholipids that facilitate tear film presentation and control evaporation.

All three products are contact lens-friendly and can be used for 180 days after opening.

Shop now

 

References

  1. Akpek EK, Bunya VY, Saldanha IJ. ‘Sjögren’s Syndrome: More Than Just Dry Eye’, Cornea, National Library of Medicine, 2019 May;38(5):658-661. Accessed July 2023.
  2. NHS Inform, ‘Sjogren’s syndrome’, 23/02/2023. Accessed July 2023.
  3. NHS, ‘Sjögren’s syndrome’, 21/04/2020. Accessed July 2023.
  4. Women’s Health Research Institute, ‘Sjogren’s Syndrome More Common in Women’. Accessed July 2023.
  5. Arthritis Foundation, ‘Sjögren’s syndrome’. Accessed July 2023.
  6. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, ‘Sjögren’s Syndrome’, 01/2021. Accessed July 2023.
  7. Complete Eye Care, ‘How Does Hydration Affect My Eyes?’. Accessed July 2023.
  8. Meixner, M. ‘The 9 Most Important Vitamins for Eye Health’, 16/02/2023. Accessed July 2023.
Back to news

Rheumatoid Arthritis and Dry Eye

Did you know that approximately one in ten patients with Dry Eye Disease also have Sjögren’s syndrome?[1] If you have both conditions, we’re here to support you. In this blog, we’ll be exploring the relationship between the two conditions and how you can treat them.

What is Sjögren’s syndrome?

Sjögren’s syndrome is an autoimmune condition, meaning that instead of protecting the body from abnormal cells, the immune system starts attacking healthy cells and tissue.[2] In this case, it affects the parts of the body that create fluids, like tears and saliva.[3] The condition can occur on its own or with other diseases linked to the immune system, like rheumatoid arthritis, which can cause dry eyes.[4] For more information on this condition, visit our blog: Rheumatoid Arthritis and Dry Eye

couple laughing together

How are Sjögren’s syndrome and Dry Eye Disease linked?

Sjögren’s syndrome usually appears in people aged 40-60.[3] As with Dry Eye Syndrome, it is much more common in women than men, with women nine times more likely to have Sjögren’s syndrome.[3][4] While there isn’t yet a definitive answer as to why Sjögren’s syndrome affects women more than men, researchers believe it could be linked to the hormone estrogen. Estrogen levels drop after menopause, which aligns with the ages that Sjögren’s syndrome appears.[5] To find out more about dry eyes and menopause, visit our blog: 5 Things You Need to Know About Menopause and Dry Eye

Overall, Sjögren’s syndrome and Dry Eye Disease are linked because of the immune system’s attack on tear glands. It limits the production of tears that would usually add moisture to your eyes, resulting in dry eyes.[6] Read on to find out more about the symptoms of Sjögren’s syndrome and dry eyes.

 

a dry eye

What are the symptoms of Sjögren’s syndrome and dry eyes?

There are a whole host of Sjögren’s syndrome symptoms to look out for! These include:

  • Dry eyes
  • Dry mouth
  • Dry skin
  • Tiredness
  • Vaginal dryness
  • Muscle or joint pain
  • Swollen salivary glands
  • Rashes [3]

a woman struggling with dry eye disease at a desk

Because of the lack of tears being produced, people might notice Dry Eye symptoms such as:

  • Itchy eyes
  • Burning eyes
  • Aching eyes
  • Eyes feel heavy
  • Eyes feel sore
  • Eyes feel gritty or sandy
  • Eyes are red
  • Eyes are blurry
  • Feeling fatigued

For more symptoms of dry eyes, visit our web page: Symptoms of Dry Eye

How do you treat dry eyes and Sjögren’s syndrome?

There is no cure for Sjögren’s syndrome, but there are treatments that can help alleviate symptoms.[3] Follow these steps:

 

Stay hydrated

woman with dry eye drinking a glass of water

Adding more water to your body is a great way to combat dry eyes. Experts recommend drinking eight to 10 glasses of water a day to keep your body completely hydrated.[7] To help you do this, buy a labelled water bottle or keep a note of how much water you are drinking per day.

Avoid alcohol

a cold beer

Drinking alcohol is bad for dry eyes and Sjögren’s syndrome as it can dehydrate your body. As both conditions already do this, symptoms are intensified. Click here for more information: Is Drinking Alcohol Bad For Your Eyes?

Eat well

fresh berries

What you eat can affect your eyes and health in general. You can support yourself by adding vitamins and minerals into your diet, such as Vitamin A, E and C.[8] Read more about eye health: 6 Vitamins for Dry Eyes

Consider moisture chamber goggles

man wearing moisture chamber goggles

Did you know wearing glasses can reduce tear evaporation by up to 30%? This can be maximised by wearing moisture chamber goggles.[2] These can be worn in the day, but it’s also a good idea to sleep in them. Find out more here: 10 Tips to Ease Dry Eye at Night

Use eye drops

a woman with dry eyes using eye drops

Lubricating your eyes is one of the best ways to treat dry eyes and Sjögren’s syndrome. To find out whether you should opt for eye drops or eye gel for dry eyes, read this useful resource: Eye Drops vs Eye Gel for the Treatment of Dry Eyes

 

For more information about conditions related to dry eyes, visit our blog: 6 Conditions that Cause Dry Eye.

 

In most cases, the best way to treat dry eyes, Also known as dry eye syndrome, is to use eye gel or eye drops.

VisuXL Gel® is a preservative-free smart gel lubricant for dry eye syndrome. It provides comfort in a bottle with it’s long-lasting lubrication properties giving 12-hour dosing with just one drop and is suitable for both day and night use.

VisuXL® is a preservative-free eye drop lubricant for dry eye syndrome. Due to its unique ingredients, VisuXL® will help you recover from eye surgery, an injury or persistent damaging dry eye.

VisuEvo® is a preservative-free eye drop that prevents excessive evaporation of the tear film. Its unique formula contains omega-3 essential fatty acids, Vitamins A and D and ultra-filtered phospholipids that facilitate tear film presentation and control evaporation.

All three products are contact lens-friendly and can be used for 180 days after opening.

Shop now

 

References

  1. Akpek EK, Bunya VY, Saldanha IJ. ‘Sjögren’s Syndrome: More Than Just Dry Eye’, Cornea, National Library of Medicine, 2019 May;38(5):658-661. Accessed July 2023.
  2. NHS Inform, ‘Sjogren’s syndrome’, 23/02/2023. Accessed July 2023.
  3. NHS, ‘Sjögren’s syndrome’, 21/04/2020. Accessed July 2023.
  4. Women’s Health Research Institute, ‘Sjogren’s Syndrome More Common in Women’. Accessed July 2023.
  5. Arthritis Foundation, ‘Sjögren’s syndrome’. Accessed July 2023.
  6. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, ‘Sjögren’s Syndrome’, 01/2021. Accessed July 2023.
  7. Complete Eye Care, ‘How Does Hydration Affect My Eyes?’. Accessed July 2023.
  8. Meixner, M. ‘The 9 Most Important Vitamins for Eye Health’, 16/02/2023. Accessed July 2023.
Back to news

Blepharitis and Dry Eye

Did you know that approximately one in ten patients with Dry Eye Disease also have Sjögren’s syndrome?[1] If you have both conditions, we’re here to support you. In this blog, we’ll be exploring the relationship between the two conditions and how you can treat them.

What is Sjögren’s syndrome?

Sjögren’s syndrome is an autoimmune condition, meaning that instead of protecting the body from abnormal cells, the immune system starts attacking healthy cells and tissue.[2] In this case, it affects the parts of the body that create fluids, like tears and saliva.[3] The condition can occur on its own or with other diseases linked to the immune system, like rheumatoid arthritis, which can cause dry eyes.[4] For more information on this condition, visit our blog: Rheumatoid Arthritis and Dry Eye

couple laughing together

How are Sjögren’s syndrome and Dry Eye Disease linked?

Sjögren’s syndrome usually appears in people aged 40-60.[3] As with Dry Eye Syndrome, it is much more common in women than men, with women nine times more likely to have Sjögren’s syndrome.[3][4] While there isn’t yet a definitive answer as to why Sjögren’s syndrome affects women more than men, researchers believe it could be linked to the hormone estrogen. Estrogen levels drop after menopause, which aligns with the ages that Sjögren’s syndrome appears.[5] To find out more about dry eyes and menopause, visit our blog: 5 Things You Need to Know About Menopause and Dry Eye

Overall, Sjögren’s syndrome and Dry Eye Disease are linked because of the immune system’s attack on tear glands. It limits the production of tears that would usually add moisture to your eyes, resulting in dry eyes.[6] Read on to find out more about the symptoms of Sjögren’s syndrome and dry eyes.

 

a dry eye

What are the symptoms of Sjögren’s syndrome and dry eyes?

There are a whole host of Sjögren’s syndrome symptoms to look out for! These include:

  • Dry eyes
  • Dry mouth
  • Dry skin
  • Tiredness
  • Vaginal dryness
  • Muscle or joint pain
  • Swollen salivary glands
  • Rashes [3]

a woman struggling with dry eye disease at a desk

Because of the lack of tears being produced, people might notice Dry Eye symptoms such as:

  • Itchy eyes
  • Burning eyes
  • Aching eyes
  • Eyes feel heavy
  • Eyes feel sore
  • Eyes feel gritty or sandy
  • Eyes are red
  • Eyes are blurry
  • Feeling fatigued

For more symptoms of dry eyes, visit our web page: Symptoms of Dry Eye

How do you treat dry eyes and Sjögren’s syndrome?

There is no cure for Sjögren’s syndrome, but there are treatments that can help alleviate symptoms.[3] Follow these steps:

 

Stay hydrated

woman with dry eye drinking a glass of water

Adding more water to your body is a great way to combat dry eyes. Experts recommend drinking eight to 10 glasses of water a day to keep your body completely hydrated.[7] To help you do this, buy a labelled water bottle or keep a note of how much water you are drinking per day.

Avoid alcohol

a cold beer

Drinking alcohol is bad for dry eyes and Sjögren’s syndrome as it can dehydrate your body. As both conditions already do this, symptoms are intensified. Click here for more information: Is Drinking Alcohol Bad For Your Eyes?

Eat well

fresh berries

What you eat can affect your eyes and health in general. You can support yourself by adding vitamins and minerals into your diet, such as Vitamin A, E and C.[8] Read more about eye health: 6 Vitamins for Dry Eyes

Consider moisture chamber goggles

man wearing moisture chamber goggles

Did you know wearing glasses can reduce tear evaporation by up to 30%? This can be maximised by wearing moisture chamber goggles.[2] These can be worn in the day, but it’s also a good idea to sleep in them. Find out more here: 10 Tips to Ease Dry Eye at Night

Use eye drops

a woman with dry eyes using eye drops

Lubricating your eyes is one of the best ways to treat dry eyes and Sjögren’s syndrome. To find out whether you should opt for eye drops or eye gel for dry eyes, read this useful resource: Eye Drops vs Eye Gel for the Treatment of Dry Eyes

 

For more information about conditions related to dry eyes, visit our blog: 6 Conditions that Cause Dry Eye.

 

In most cases, the best way to treat dry eyes, Also known as dry eye syndrome, is to use eye gel or eye drops.

VisuXL Gel® is a preservative-free smart gel lubricant for dry eye syndrome. It provides comfort in a bottle with it’s long-lasting lubrication properties giving 12-hour dosing with just one drop and is suitable for both day and night use.

VisuXL® is a preservative-free eye drop lubricant for dry eye syndrome. Due to its unique ingredients, VisuXL® will help you recover from eye surgery, an injury or persistent damaging dry eye.

VisuEvo® is a preservative-free eye drop that prevents excessive evaporation of the tear film. Its unique formula contains omega-3 essential fatty acids, Vitamins A and D and ultra-filtered phospholipids that facilitate tear film presentation and control evaporation.

All three products are contact lens-friendly and can be used for 180 days after opening.

Shop now

 

References

  1. Akpek EK, Bunya VY, Saldanha IJ. ‘Sjögren’s Syndrome: More Than Just Dry Eye’, Cornea, National Library of Medicine, 2019 May;38(5):658-661. Accessed July 2023.
  2. NHS Inform, ‘Sjogren’s syndrome’, 23/02/2023. Accessed July 2023.
  3. NHS, ‘Sjögren’s syndrome’, 21/04/2020. Accessed July 2023.
  4. Women’s Health Research Institute, ‘Sjogren’s Syndrome More Common in Women’. Accessed July 2023.
  5. Arthritis Foundation, ‘Sjögren’s syndrome’. Accessed July 2023.
  6. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, ‘Sjögren’s Syndrome’, 01/2021. Accessed July 2023.
  7. Complete Eye Care, ‘How Does Hydration Affect My Eyes?’. Accessed July 2023.
  8. Meixner, M. ‘The 9 Most Important Vitamins for Eye Health’, 16/02/2023. Accessed July 2023.
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3-Step Treatment Plan for Dry Eyes

A three-step treatment plan is one of the most effective ways to treat dry eyes. By following these three simple steps, you could reduce your symptoms significantly.

 

Woman with Eye Mask

Step 1: Use a warm compress

Begin by using a heated compress, such as MeiboPatch®, over your eyes. Lay this over your upper face so that it covers the bridge of your nose, upper and lower eyelids.

You should keep this mask on for seven to 10 minutes, during which time it will gently release warmth which can fluidise secretions that may have blocked the meibomian glands.

After you remove the mask, you should give your dry eyes a gentle eyelid massage to help release the oils from the glands.

Always keep your eyes closed when using a warm compress, and we recommend buying a new MeiboPatch® every 1-2 months, to make sure hygiene measures are followed.[1]

To find out more about our MeiboPatch®, click here: MeiboPatch®

 

Woman Wiping Eye

Step 2: Wipe your dry eyes

Cleanse and wipe away the melted oil from your meibomian glands, as well as any built-up debris. You should do this with a cleanser like Naviblef®.

Close your dry eyes and massage your eyelids and eyelashes with the foam, then leave it there for around 60-80 seconds. Then, rinse your eyelashes and eyelids with warm water.

Discover more about Naviblef® here: Naviblef® [2]

 

Eye with Eye Drops

Step 3: Lubricate your dry eyes

Use an effective lubricant like any drop from our VISUfamily range. Depending on your condition, you need to choose an eye drop that will work for you and ease your symptoms.

Find out more about what eye drop for dry eyes would be best for you here: Eye Drops vs Eye Gel For The Treatment of Dry Eyes

 

In most cases, the best way to treat dry eyes, Also known as dry eye syndrome, is to use eye gel or eye drops.

VisuXL Gel® is a preservative-free smart gel lubricant for dry eye syndrome. It provides comfort in a bottle with it’s long-lasting lubrication properties giving 12-hour dosing with just one drop and is suitable for both day and night use.

VisuXL® is a preservative-free eye drop lubricant for dry eye syndrome. Due to its unique ingredients, VisuXL® will help you recover from eye surgery, an injury or persistent damaging dry eye.

VisuEvo® is a preservative-free eye drop that prevents excessive evaporation of the tear film. Its unique formula contains omega-3 essential fatty acids, Vitamins A and D and ultra-filtered phospholipids that facilitate tear film presentation and control evaporation.

All three products are contact lens-friendly and can be used for 180 days after opening.

Shop now

References

  1. MeiboPatch® Instructions for Use (IFU). Accessed February 2023.
  2. Naviblef® Instructions for Use (IFU). Accessed February 2023.
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How to Put in Eye Drops for Dry Eye

Whether you’re using eye drops for hay fever, conditions like styes, or Dry Eye Disease, we’re here for you. Read on to find out our tips on how to put in eye drops for Dry Eye.

 

How to put in eye drops: Step-by-step instructions

Before you put your eye drops in, make sure that your hands are nice and clean. Additionally, have tissues nearby to wipe away any excess tears or drops that might occur.[1]

 

Step 1: Prepare

Wash your hands and make sure that you have everything you need around you.

 

Step 2: Tilt your head

Sit up and look up, or lay down if this is easier. 

 

Step 3: Pull down your eyelid

Pull your eyelid down and away from your eyeball, making a pocket for your drops.

 

Step 4: Squeeze the bottle

Put the prescribed number of drops into your eye, or the number of drops suggested on the bottle or instructions for use. You may have to squeeze or use a pump action to administer the drops.

 

Step 5: Close your eyes

Close your eye for at least one minute and hold your finger over your tear duct (the small hole in the corner of your eye).

 

Make sure that you always close the eye drop container after use.[2] If you use more than one type of eye medication, wait at least five minutes between using each type.[3]

 

Woman puts eye drops into her eyes

 

Should you blink after putting eye drops in?

This often depends on doctor’s advice. However, Dan T. Gudgel of the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) recommends that you should not blink. Instead, close your eyes for at least one minute.[4]

 

How long should you close your eyes after eye drops?

You should close your eyes for a minimum of one minute, to allow the drops to soak into your eyes and prevent them from soaking into your nose.[3]

 

How many times a day can you use eye drops?

The number of times a day you should use eye drops varies depending on the type of eye drop you choose. VisuXL® eye drops only need to be used two times a day, making them a solution that can become part of your daily routine.[2]  

 

Man putting eye drops into eye

 

How far away do you hold eye drops?

You should put eye drops within one inch of your eye, when you are applying them.[5] This allows you to aim better into the pocket that you have created.

 

How should I store eye drops?

Eye drops need to be stored effectively to prevent being spoiled. Bottles usually need to be kept in a cool, dry place, unless otherwise stated on the instructions for use.[6]

 

Best eye drops for dry eyes

We offer a vast range of eye drops for dry eyes, so that you can be prepared. From VisuXL® Gel to Xailin® Tears, we have everything you could need.

Our latest blog helps you to identify which Dry Eye products would suit your needs, based on your symptoms. For more information on eye gels and eye drops for dry eyes, visit this blog: Eye Drops vs Eye Gel for Dry Eyes

 

In most cases, the best way to treat dry eyes, Also known as dry eye syndrome, is to use eye gel or eye drops.

VisuXL Gel® is a preservative-free smart gel lubricant for dry eye syndrome. It provides comfort in a bottle with it’s long-lasting lubrication properties giving 12-hour dosing with just one drop and is suitable for both day and night use.

VisuXL® is a preservative-free eye drop lubricant for dry eye syndrome. Due to its unique ingredients, VisuXL® will help you recover from eye surgery, an injury or persistent damaging dry eye.

VisuEvo® is a preservative-free eye drop that prevents excessive evaporation of the tear film. Its unique formula contains omega-3 essential fatty acids, Vitamins A and D and ultra-filtered phospholipids that facilitate tear film presentation and control evaporation.

All three products are contact lens-friendly and can be used for 180 days after opening.

Shop now

References

  1. Healthline. ‘How to Use Eye Drops’. Accessed January 2023.
  2. VisuXL® Instructions for Use (IFU). Accessed January 2023.
  3. National Eye Institute. ‘How to Put in Eye Drops’, 23/07/21. Accessed January 2023.
  4. Dan T. Gudgel. ‘How to Put in Eye Drops’, American Academy of Ophthamology, 10/03/21. Accessed January 2023.
  5. WebMD. ‘How to Insert Eye Drops’, 21/08/22. Accessed January 2023.
  6. Dr.Manoj Rai Mehta. ‘How to Safely Store Eye Drop Dispensers at Home or Office’,Practo, 06/04/17. Accessed January 2023.
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Can the Environment Cause Dry Eyes?

You may have noticed that the change of seasons or new surroundings has suddenly worsened your Dry Eye symptoms. This is because your environment can trigger Dry Eye syndrome, with factors like the weather, climate, and air quality all contributing. Let’s explore some of the specific environmental factors to bear in mind when trying to improve your condition. 

 

Frost on grass

Can the time of year impact dry eyes?

Changes to the air temperature, humidity, and air quality come with the changing seasons. So it’s only natural that throughout certain seasons your eyes may become more irritated and dry. Spring can bring about seasonal allergies such as hay fever when allergens in the air are more prominent. When the pollen count is high, many Dry Eye sufferers will find that their symptoms worsen. However, we’d always recommend speaking to your doctor if this is the case, as often over-the-counter medication such as antihistamines can make Dry Eye symptoms worse as a side effect. 

In addition to this, colder months throughout winter can irritate dry eyes the most when compared to the other seasons. This is because of the cold air outside, combined with indoor heating making a very dry environment. Indoor humidifiers are a good way to try and keep more moisture in your air at home and help to improve your symptoms.[1]

 

Waterfall surrounded by greenery

What climate is best for dry eyes?

Hot, dry air can cause moisture from your eyes to evaporate quickly, yet as we’ve discussed already, colder weather can trigger dry eye syndrome too.  The key is to find a climate that’s not too hot, or too cold. Many researchers have seen a dip in Dry Eye throughout the summer months due to the humid air and warmer temperatures.[1] Therefore, a warm environment with plenty of moisture and humidity in the air is the ideal climate for Dry Eye sufferers.[2] So pack your bags and book that plane ticket, because now you have the perfect excuse to go on holiday!

The impact of living in the city on dry eyes

While living and working in the city can be fun and energising, it can also take a toll on your eyes. Let’s look at some of the common causes of Dry Eye Syndrome in the city.

 

London road with busy traffic

Air pollution

Our eyes are exposed to everything in the air surrounding us, whether that’s fresh air from the countryside, smoke from a fire, or pollution from traffic in the city. When exposed to pollution, small particles of dust and smoke can become stuck in your tear film. This means that you’re not able to produce as many tears to keep your eyes lubricated and moist, which often results in dry, irritated eyes. You can help to ease these symptoms by using umbrellas to shield your face against smog and dust, as well as wrap-around sunglasses to stop these things from going in your eyes. [3]

 

Laptop on a desk, statistics on the screen

Screen time 

When working in cities, it’s often the norm to have a standard 9-5 office job, where you spend most of your day behind a computer screen. In addition to this, many who live in the city rely on public transport such as trains, trams or buses to get to and from work every day. During this commute, the majority of people will be on their phones. Increased screen time can result in a condition called Digital Eye Strain, or Computer Eye Syndrome. It’s a common condition that affects many office workers, yet only 1 in 5 people are aware of having it.[3] Trying to reduce your screen time is the best way to reduce the symptoms of Digital Eye Strain and keep your monitor at eye level when working. 

How to alleviate Dry Eye symptoms

While there is no permanent cure for Dry Eye Syndrome, there are some simple steps you can take to help alleviate your symptoms. 

 

Orange sliced open

Eat more vitamins

Monitoring your diet and increasing the amount of specific vitamins you eat can be useful in reducing dry eyes. Here is a list of the best vitamins for the eyes. 

  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin E
  • Omega 3
  • Vitamin C
  • Flaxseed Oil
  • Zinc
  • Vitamin D
  • Lutein & Zeaxanthin [4]

wraparound sunglasses for dry eye laid on a hat

Wear wrap-around sunglasses

Wearing special wrap-around glasses for dry eyes is a great way to ensure your eyes stay protected from harsh winds, cold air, dust, and debris. These glasses also often feature special lenses which act as a barrier between your eyes and the environment – including allergens like pollen. This makes them a great choice for hay fever sufferers, as the condition can make Dry Eye symptoms worse.[5] 

 

Hands type on a laptop keyboard

Take a break from screen time

As we’ve previously mentioned, screen time is one of the biggest causes of Dry Eye Syndrome. Reducing your screen time where possible will help to relieve your symptoms. Even if you work behind a computer, taking regular breaks from looking at the screen is important. We like to follow the 20/20/20 rule, which is a simple lifestyle change to help remind you to take a break from your screen. The rule is that every 20 minutes, you should look at something which is 20 feet away, for 20 seconds or more. This can be applied when working or watching TV, and numerous studies have found that it’s successful in alleviating Dry Eye symptoms as a result of too much screen time.[6]

For more information on Computer Vision Syndrome, read our blog.

 

Close up of brown eye

Use VisuXL Gel® 

While these lifestyle changes can help to relieve your symptoms of Dry Eye, the best way to feel fully comfortable is to use over-the-counter medications.  VisuXL Gel® provides 12-hour protection with just one drop and works by increasing the moisture in your eyes to form a protective cushion around them.[7]

To find out more about VisuXL® Gel visit our VISUfarma shop.

In most cases, the best way to treat dry eyes, Also known as dry eye syndrome, is to use eye gel or eye drops.

VisuXL Gel® is a preservative-free smart gel lubricant for dry eye syndrome. It provides comfort in a bottle with it’s long-lasting lubrication properties giving 12-hour dosing with just one drop and is suitable for both day and night use.

VisuXL® is a preservative-free eye drop lubricant for dry eye syndrome. Due to its unique ingredients, VisuXL® will help you recover from eye surgery, an injury or persistent damaging dry eye.

VisuEvo® is a preservative-free eye drop that prevents excessive evaporation of the tear film. Its unique formula contains omega-3 essential fatty acids, Vitamins A and D and ultra-filtered phospholipids that facilitate tear film presentation and control evaporation.

All three products are contact lens-friendly and can be used for 180 days after opening.

Shop now

References

  1. Complete Eye Care of Medina, ‘Which season has the greatest impact on dry eyes’. Accessed December 2022.
  2. Seltman, Whitney, ‘Climate, Environment and Dry Eye’ WebMD, 21/06/21. Accessed December 2022.
  3. London Vision Clinic, ‘The effect on your eyes working in the city (London)’ 6/11/15. Accessed December 2022.
  4. Capogna, Laurie, Eye Wellness, ‘The Best Supplements for Dry Eye’ 13/07/21. Accessed December 2022.
  5. Specsavers, ‘Dry Eyes and Glasses Explained’. Accessed December 2022.
  6. Reddy, S. C., Low, C., Lim, Y., Low, L., Mardina, F. and Nursaleha, M. (2013) “Computer vision syndrome: a study of knowledge and practices in university students”, Nepalese Journal of Ophthalmology. Accessed December 2022.
  7. VisuXL Gel Instructions for Use (IFU). Accessed December 2022.
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How to Cope with Dry Eye in Summer

Does your Dry Eye feel worse in summer? Don’t worry, you’re not alone. Many people are aware of the risk of dry eyes in winter, due to the harsh, cold weather conditions. Whilst Dry Eye Syndrome is usually worse for patients in winter and spring, it can also be triggered by warm, dry weather in the summer months. [1]

In this article, our Dry Eye expert covers the causes of that itchy feeling in the summer months and lists seven tips to avoid dry, sore, itchy eyes.

Can Dry Eye be worse in the summer?

Dry eyes can often feel worse in summer, as warm weather can cause the tear film to evaporate from your eyes. [2] While the air is more humid which can provide relief to some of the symptoms and you’re less likely to spend days staring at screens, summertime activities like swimming can actually aggravate the condition.

Here are some of the causes of dry eyes in summer:

 

Blue Sky

 

Dry air

Dry air means dry eyes! In summer, researchers actually see a dip in Dry Eye cases in America. This is due to increased humidity, which adds moisture into the air. [3] However, this isn’t the case in many other places.

 

Sunset in a Field

 

The sun

The summer sun can feel lovely, but can also be very harmful. UV rays can cause the moisture in your eyes to evaporate, making your eyes very dry. [2]

 

Air Conditioning with Remote

 

Air conditioning

Although not regularly seen across the UK, an air-conditioned room is common part of any hot holiday. Air conditioning reduces the amount of humidity and moisture in the air, which can dry out your eyes. The cold temperatures can also reduce the ability of meibomian glands to secrete oils that prevent tears from evaporating. [2]

 

Woman with dry eye or hayfever blows her nose in a field

 

Allergies

Hay fever season runs between late March and September, which crosses over the summer months. [4] Many people who suffer from Dry Eye also suffer from allergies, so hay fever season can be a tough time. [1]

Find out more about Dry Eye and hay fever here: How Does Hayfever Season Affect Dry Eye Sufferers?

 

Water Bottle sits in the foreground as a woman ties her trainers in the background

 

Dehydration

Do you drink enough liquids in summer? It can be easy to forget to drink enough in summer, which can lead to dehydration. When we’re dehydrated, our body prioritises using water for important factors like brain function. This means that our dry eyes can get left behind, unable to make enough healthy tears. [2]

 

Hand with Barbeque Tongs Over Barbeque

BBQs

Summer isn’t complete without a barbeque gathering! However, if you have dry eyes, you should avoid being the one on the grill. If you get smoke in your eyes, it can make them red, and cause itching and burning sensations. [5]

 

Hat and Legs of Woman in Pool

Swimming pools

The best way to cool down after a hot summer day is in a cold pool! Whether you’re on holiday or in the garden, relaxing in the cold water is much-needed. But, the chlorine in pools can actually wash away your tear film, increasing Dry Eye symptoms. [6]

 

Friends cheers with drinks in the summer

 

Alcohol

Did you know that more people drink alcohol in summer? According to a study published in the Journals of Studies on Alcohol, summer and Christmas are the most popular times to drink alcohol. [7] With many people going on all-inclusive holidays and a higher number of people socialising, this isn’t surprising. Alcohol should be approached with caution, though, as it makes it harder for the body to produce enough tears to hydrate your eyes. [8]

You can find out more about the effect of alcohol on dry eyes in our blog: Is Drinking Alcohol Bad For Your Eyes?

 

How can you get rid of Dry Eye Syndrome in the summer?

Are you wondering how to keep your eyes cool in summer? Follow these tips to help!

 

Man with dry eye wears sunglasses and drinks water outside

 

1. Stay hydrated

Eyes become dry when they are dehydrated, just like the rest of the body. In summer, when the weather is warmer, we need to drink more liquids – especially when we exercise. Researchers state that this is because our body tries to cool itself down by sweating, so water is lost. [9]

If you’re suffering from dry, itchy eyes, experts recommend drinking between 8 and 10 glasses of water a day to prevent flare-ups during warmer weather. [10]

 

A couple wears wrap around sunglasses to fight dry eye and sport bike gear

 

2. Wear wraparound glasses to combat Dry Eye

Wearing sunglasses when out and about helps to protect your eyes from the sun, wind, and dirt. Wraparound sunglasses for dry eyes are ideal to protect them from the elements in summer. Make sure the sunglasses have at least 98% UV protection to keep your eyes from feeling sore and itchy when you’re outside. [11]

 

Woman with Eye Mask in Bed

 

3. Use a heated compress at night

If you are suffering from Evaporative Dry Eye, or Meibomian Gland Dysfunction, a heated compress, such as MeiboPatch®, will be ideal for unblocking your meibomian glands and help minimise dry eyes at night. [12]

Browse our MeiboPatch® solution here: MeiboPatch®

 

Woman in Pool with Goggles

 

4. Always wear goggles when swimming

Wherever you are this summer, your well-deserved break will hopefully include a relaxing swim in the pool or the sea.
If you submerge your head underwater whilst swimming, it’s important to always wear goggles. The chlorine in swimming pools and the salt in seawater can irritate the eyes, causing existing Dry Eye symptoms to worsen. [13]

 

A pile of fruit that can help provide the vitamins that soothe dry eye

 

5. Take vitamins

There are certain vitamins and minerals that boost eye health, which can help if you suffer from Dry Eye Syndrome.
Adding vitamins which boost eye health into your diet, combined with a regular treatment plan, can reduce symptoms and improve your quality of life. With many fresh fruit and vegetables in season, summer is the perfect time to try and eat more foods which are rich in Vitamin C, E and D. [14]

Read more about vitamins for dry eyes here: 6 Vitamins for Dry Eyes

 

A humidifier works in a white room with plants in the background

 

6. Put a humidifier in your home to ease Dry Eye

If you suffer from itchy, red, sore or watery eyes, getting a humidifier is a great idea to ease your symptoms. A humidifier helps combat the warm, dry heat of summer months to lubricate your eyes.

If you struggle with night-time dry eyes in the summer, putting the humidifier in your bedroom can help relieve symptoms. [15]

For more lifestyle changes you can make, visit this blog: 6 Lifestyle Tips to Help Dry Eye

 

Woman Using Eye Drops to fight dry eye

 

7. Use eye drops for dry eye

If you’re planning on taking a trip, don’t leave without your eye drops, as an uncomfortable flare-up could ruin your holiday.

Use long lasting eye drops for dry eyes, like VisuXL® eye drops can help provide relief for irritating symptoms such as dry, itchy, red, sore or watery eyes. VisuXL® eye drops in particular can help to provide more symptomatic relief than a standard eye drop can provide.

Other eye drops on the market are linear Hyaluronic Acid drops, whereas VisuXL® is a patented formula. In VisuXL® eye drops, Hyaluronic Acid is crossed-linked so that it doesn’t wash away easily when blinking. Instead, it remains on the eye for longer. It also forms a net on the surface of the eye, to help the second key ingredient, CoQ10, to repair damaged cells. [16]

Hopefully, these top tips will help you to get outside and enjoy the sunshine this summer, without having to worry about dry eyes.

Get prepared for Dry Eye and summer with our VisuXL® Eye Drops, which you can browse here: VisuXL® Eye Drops

 

In most cases, the best way to treat dry eyes, Also known as dry eye syndrome, is to use eye gel or eye drops.

VisuXL Gel® is a preservative-free smart gel lubricant for dry eye syndrome. It provides comfort in a bottle with it’s long-lasting lubrication properties giving 12-hour dosing with just one drop and is suitable for both day and night use.

VisuXL® is a preservative-free eye drop lubricant for dry eye syndrome. Due to its unique ingredients, VisuXL® will help you recover from eye surgery, an injury or persistent damaging dry eye.

VisuEvo® is a preservative-free eye drop that prevents excessive evaporation of the tear film. Its unique formula contains omega-3 essential fatty acids, Vitamins A and D and ultra-filtered phospholipids that facilitate tear film presentation and control evaporation.

All three products are contact lens-friendly and can be used for 180 days after opening.

Shop now

 

References

  1. Kumar, N., Feuer, W., Lanza, N. L., & Galor, ‘A, Seasonal Variation in Dry Eye’, Ophthalmology, 122(8), pp. 1727-1729, 01/08/16. Accessed May 2022.
  2. East Main Vision Clinic, ‘Why is Dry Eye Worse in Summer?’, 22/07/20. Accessed February 2023.
  3. Complete Eye Care of Medina. ‘Which Season Has The Greatest Impact On Dry Eyes?’. Accessed December 2022.
  4. NHS England. ‘Hay fever’, 04/02/21. Accessed December 2022.
  5. Dr. Aizman Empire Retina Consultants. ‘The Effects That Smoke Can Have On Your Eyes’. Accessed February 2023.
  6. Nicole Holliman. ‘Managing Dry Eyes During Summer Months’, WebMd, 11/05/22. Accessed February 2023.
  7. D G Uitenbroek. ‘Seasonal variation in alcohol use’, National Library of Medicine, 1996 Jan;57(1):47-52. Accessed February 2023.
  8. You, Young-Sheng, Qu, Nai-Bin, Yu, Xiao-Ning, ‘Alcohol consumption and dry eye syndrome: a Meta-analysis’, International Journal of Ophthalmology, 2016; 9(10): 1487–1492. Accessed December 2021.
  9. Krempa, F. ‘Experts Say You Should Drink This Much More Water Per Day When It’s Hot Outside’, 05/07/21. Accessed February 2023.
  10. Complete Eye Care, ‘How Does Hydration Affect My Eyes’. Accessed Sep 2021.
  11. Theriot, P, ‘The Best Sunglasses for Dry Eye Sufferers’. Accessed May 2022.
  12. MeiboPatch® Instructions for Use (IFU). Accessed May 2022.
  13. Specsavers Opticas, ‘Expat vision care: Can sea and sun exposure cause dry eyes?’, Specsavers Opticas. Accessed May 2022.
  14. Meixner, M, ‘The 9 Most Important Vitamins for Eye Health’, Healthline, 25/07/18. Accessed January 2022.
  15. Higuera, V, ‘Creating a Healthy Morning and Night-time Routine for Chronic Dry Eyes’, Healthline. Accessed May 2022.
  16. VisuXL® Instructions for Use (IFU). Accessed May 2022.
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